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How do I tell beamer that I want allowframebreaks allowed by default?

Something like noitemsep for itemize: \setlist[itemize]{noitemsep}

So that I don't have to do:

\begin{frame}[allowframebreaks]
    something
\end{frame}

but just:

\begin{frame}
    something
\end{frame}
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A short answer here is going to be 'you can't, at least easily', I'm afraid. Till was really not keen on the idea of auto-breaking frames, and the 'reset' for the appropriate key is buried inside \beamer@@@@frame. This can probably be removed using etoolbox, and the key then fixed as true using \setkeys{beamerframe}{allowframebreaks}. However, this is really against the whole concept of how beamer is structured. –  Joseph Wright Mar 1 '13 at 20:15
    
I've read that I shouldn't use allowframebreaks, BUT: It makes my life easier and (as the programmer part of me says "keep the code DRY"). Don't have to make frames with identical headings as I can use manual \framebreak instead. –  mreq Mar 1 '13 at 20:17
2  
Writing a document isn't coding, and I suspect Till would say that two frames with the same title suggests that they are actually a (sub)section and you're abusing the title of the frame :-) More importantly, presentations are visual things, and therefore automatic breaking is very unlikely to make good decisions. –  Joseph Wright Mar 1 '13 at 20:19
    
Just in case someone is looking at this question looking for a way to set default frame options (in general): my answer here might provide some help. –  Juan A. Navarro Aug 22 '13 at 11:14
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since everyone is telling you not to do it, here;s one way of doing it:-)

enter image description here

\documentclass{beamer}

\let\oldframe\frame
\renewcommand\frame[1][allowframebreaks]{\oldframe[#1]}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
\begin{enumerate}
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\item    something \item    something \item    something
\end{enumerate}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

That leaves breaking as the default option but if you specify any other option the default is not used so you need to include allowframebreaks whenever you have an option.

If you definitely always want it (rather than just having it as default if no option used) you can use instead of the above

 \renewcommand\frame[1][]{\oldframe[allowframebreaks,#1]}

so that allowframebreaks is always prepended to the option list.

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@GonzaloMedina sure, but you can either include allowframebreaks whenever you have an option or if you definitely always want it (rather than just having it as default if no option used) you can use \renewcommand\frame[1][]{\oldframe[allowframebreaks,#1]} –  David Carlisle Sep 13 '13 at 16:19
    
@GonzaloMedina OK will do –  David Carlisle Sep 13 '13 at 16:30
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This doesn't answer your question, but rather details some reasons why you might not want to do that.

Presentations are not like regular documents. When constructing a presentation, every frame needs to be carefully constructed, and allowing automatic frame breaks somewhat implies that you might have copy & pasted from another document- the audience will pick up on this.

A few of guidelines that I like to adhere to:

  • no more than 10 words per frame
  • use (tikz/PSTricks) pictures and images wherever possible
  • schedule about 1 frame per 3-5 minutes (the longer the better)- your slides need to support your talk, not the other way round

Any time that I have broken these rules, I have found that the audience is lost- do they listen to me, or do they try and read the slides?

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I fully agree with that. I don't want/need automatic breaking, I need the manual one. For instance: including a full-height image: screencloud.net/v/rQKl –  mreq Mar 1 '13 at 21:46
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