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I have the following line in my report.tex

\include{intro/introduction}
\include{prlm/preliminary}
\include{svy/survey}

and the corresponding directory structure. The directory structure is relative to the directory in which report.tex lies is:

/intro/introduction.tex
/prlm/preliminary.tex
/svy/survey.tex

The first two (introduction and preliminary) were already there and I just added survey.tex file to my report.

Now Latex would repeatedly complain that No file svy/survey.aux.. I know it is not there as latex has not parsed the corresponding tex file. I do not know how to eliminate this.

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if you're really annoyed about the latex complaint, you can create (manually) a file survey.aux that contains just one line -- \relax. but i'm not sure that latex won't continue to read that one even after the tex file has been read, since you've specified a different directory. –  barbara beeton Mar 5 '13 at 18:19
    
"since you've specified a different directory" I did not understand this part. –  Aman Deep Gautam Mar 5 '13 at 18:32
1  
Until you don't process at least once a file declared with \include, the corresponding .aux file will not be produced. Just compile once without \includeonly. However the warning is innocuous. –  egreg Mar 5 '13 at 18:34
    
@egreg That got it done. I somehow forgot to include it. Please write it as an answer so I can accept it. –  Aman Deep Gautam Mar 5 '13 at 18:45
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A subsidiary file can be loaded either with \input or \include; when the latter is used, a \clearpage command is issued, but this is not the main point.

The \include system is meant to avoid recompiling parts of a bigger document, using the \includeonly command, which receives as argument the file names we want to process.

The system works by writing an .aux file for each file loaded with \include, so that the information about page numbers and cross references is available even if the file is not processed and the information will be what results from the last time the file has been actually loaded.

However, the .aux file is not produced when a file has not been processed at least once and LaTeX issues a warning about this, as a reminder.

The warning in itself is innocuous; you can avoid it by running LaTeX on the file having commented the \includeonly line.

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