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How do I suppress the "In: " before the journaltitle? Like so:

In: Journal of Applied Physics

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Use biblatex-apa? –  Seamus Feb 9 '11 at 17:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 113 down vote accepted
+50

Insert after loading the package biblatex:

\renewbibmacro{in:}{}

or if you need it only for an entry of type @article (can easily extended to other entry types):

[...]
\usepackage{biblatex}
\renewbibmacro{in:}{%
  \ifentrytype{article}{}{\printtext{\bibstring{in}\intitlepunct}}}
[...]

enter image description here

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2  
This isn't likely going to do what is needed, since it will also remove the "In" from e.g. articles in edited volumes, for which most bibliography styles is used. The odd decision of biblatex's default is to use "In" with journal articles, which isn't very common. –  Alan Munn Feb 9 '11 at 15:48
    
@Alan: Yes, I think "In: " is needed for edited volumes, etc., and I do find the "In: " for journals rather odd. –  Kit Feb 9 '11 at 15:51
    
@Kit I've posted a sample .bbx file which solves the problem. It might solve your problem, or at least allow you to make your own along similar lines. –  Alan Munn Feb 9 '11 at 16:03
3  
@Herbert: A very elegant code snippet -- I hope you don't mind a small bounty. ;-) –  lockstep Feb 13 '11 at 9:43
2  
@lockstep I think we find it odd simply because there are no bibliography styles in the outside world that we know of that use 'In' for articles. –  Alan Munn Feb 13 '11 at 14:19

I don't know if there's a simple way to do this within a document. The way I've solved this problem is to define my own .bbx style in biblatex which fixes some of its odder defaults. This style (named here 'mybibstyle') is loaded with the [bibstyle=mybibstyle] option when you load biblatex. (This could be added to the preamble of your document, I suppose, but my preference for long modifications like this is not to add them to documents. (And this is something that one will use all the time.))

Here's a sample; the code is copied from the standard.bbx file in biblatex. This assumes the authoryear-comp style of biblatex as a starting point, and then modifies the bibliography driver for the 'article' type. (It also removes quotation marks from article titles; remove that code if you don't need it.)

If there is a simpler way to do this, I'd be glad to find out.

\ProvidesFile{mybibstyle.bbx}
\RequireBibliographyStyle{standard}
\RequireBibliographyStyle{authoryear-comp} % change this if you're not using author-year
\DeclareFieldFormat[article,incollection,unpublished]{title}{#1}%No quotes for article titles
\DeclareFieldFormat[thesis]{title}{\mkbibemph{#1}} % Theses like book titles
\DeclareBibliographyDriver{article}{%
  \usebibmacro{bibindex}%
  \usebibmacro{begentry}%
  \usebibmacro{author/translator+others}%
  \setunit{\labelnamepunct}\newblock
  \usebibmacro{title}%
  \newunit
  \printlist{language}%
  \newunit\newblock
  \usebibmacro{byauthor}%
  \newunit\newblock
  \usebibmacro{bytranslator+others}%
  \newunit\newblock
  \printfield{version}%
  \newunit\newblock%
  \usebibmacro{journal+issuetitle}%
  \newunit
  \usebibmacro{byeditor+others}%
  \newunit
  \usebibmacro{note+pages}%
  \newunit\newblock
  \iftoggle{bbx:isbn}
    {\printfield{issn}}
    {}%
  \newunit\newblock
  \usebibmacro{doi+eprint+url}%
  \newunit\newblock
  \usebibmacro{addendum+pubstate}%
  \setunit{\bibpagerefpunct}\newblock
  \usebibmacro{pageref}%
  \usebibmacro{finentry}}

If your base is using a bibstyle that itself changes the formatting of the 'article' type then you should copy that definition into your custom bbx file as the starting point. The relevant code to remove from the driver is the \usebibmacro{in:} (which is all I removed from the standard bbx version to create the one above.)

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This is precisely what I was looking for; many thanks! I too found these two defaults (the "In:" prefix and the quotes around article names) most odd, and am glad for a fix... who knows what influenced these stylistic decisions. –  Noldorin Jul 19 '13 at 4:53

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