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I do not remember which symbol is used for breaking long and repetitive figures. The meaning of this symbol is like three dots, that is it suggests that the figure is very long and repetitive. In my case, I have a rectangle very long (h<<w, where h is the height and w is the width), and I would like to break it into two parts.

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perhaps tex.stackexchange.com/questions/23860 may be of tangential interest –  Sean Allred Apr 17 '13 at 13:28
    
@seab allred: indeed, it is a symbol that I saw in many books. I do not remember well, but it should be something like a double zig-zag (like a thunder). –  no_name Apr 18 '13 at 11:48
    
@no_name: You want to create this as part of the image, right? Not in terms of referencing it. That is, you want to show only (say) 10% of the width of the actual image... perhaps the first and the last part, with some "indication of a break" within the image. –  Werner Apr 18 '13 at 21:26

1 Answer 1

You can get a double zigzag line with tikz, e.g.:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{decorations.pathmorphing}

\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}[decoration={zigzag,meta-segment length=1cm}]
\draw[decorate] (0,0) -- (0,3);
\draw[decorate] (0.2,0) -- (0.2,3);
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

Result

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