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The difficult bit is that the enumitem package has a closed list of numbering formats, and that \hebrewnumeral is not part of them. I have


but this is not so robust, e.g., it applies only to lists at the first level, and then there are issues of references to the list and more.

Any ideas on how the enumitem package can be hacked to do this?

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Would not something like \makeatletter \def\hebnum#1{\expandafter\hebrewnumeral\csname c@#1\endcsname} \AddEnumerateCounter{\hebnum}{\hebrewnumeral}{XXX} \makeatother work? Lifted from the enumitem docs sec.2.3, I don't know enough about the xetex mechanisms to try with proper hebrew stuff. – Ulrich Schwarz Feb 18 '11 at 15:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's one way to do it.

\newfontfamily\hebrewfont{Corsiva Hebrew}
        \item A
        \item B
        \item \begin{enumerate}
                \item 1
                \item 2
                \item \begin{enumerate}
                        \item a
                        \item b
                        \item \begin{enumerate}
                                \item I
                                \item II
                                \item III

enter image description here

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If you set the language with


all Arabic numerals will be replaced by Hebrew ones.

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Alas, but one does not want all numerals to change. In English for example, it would make sense to change certain enumerations to (a), (b), (c), ..., but you do not usually want to pay the price of numbering your pages, figures, tables, theorems and sections with this scheme. – Yossi Gil Feb 18 '11 at 15:49

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