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I have been using tikz-cd package to produce diagrams however I'm not finding a way to use displayed math within it. My point is that when I use the product sign for instance inside of it, it simply shows as it were inline. I'm using the following commands:

\begin{figure}[!ht]
     \centering
     \begin{tikzcd}[row sep=huge, column sep=huge, text height=1.5ex, text depth=0.25ex]
          \prod_{i=1}^{p} \arrow{r}{i} \arrow[bend right=50]{rr}{T} & \mathcal{M} \arrow{r}{\pi} & \otimes_{i=1}^{p}V_i
     \end{tikzcd}
\end{figure}

However both the normal product sign and the tensor product sign appear as inline. Is there any way to show those signs as they appear in the displaymath mode?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use \displaystyle\prod and \bigotimes\limits; I also used a shorten length for the curved arrow to prevent overlapping:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tikz-cd}

\begin{document}

\begin{figure}
     \centering
     \begin{tikzcd}[row sep=huge, column sep=huge, text height=1.5ex, text depth=0.25ex]
          \displaystyle\prod_{i=1}^{p} \arrow{r}{i} \arrow[bend right=50,shorten >=10pt]{rr}{T} & \mathcal{M} \arrow{r}{\pi} & \bigotimes\limits_{i=1}^{p}V_i
     \end{tikzcd}
\end{figure}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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Thanks very much @GonzaloMedina ! –  user1620696 Apr 28 '13 at 0:39
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\displaystyle and \limits will probably do what you want.

Try, for example, $\displaystyle \sum_{i=0}^{n}\limits a_i$.

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Hi @user12677, it worked just for \prod, for \otimes it doesn't work. Is any workaround? Thanks very much. –  user1620696 Apr 28 '13 at 0:19
    
Try \bigotimes –  user12677 Apr 28 '13 at 8:19
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