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Hi I am an absolute beginner and so far I was able to solve all problems with the help of this platform and some other forums.

But for this one I could not find a fitting thread.

I pasted some text from word into a subsection of my latex document in texmaker. The last couple of words of this text block are displayed in grey in the code window and are missing in the pdf when I push quick build. Even if I try to type these last couple of words they still appear grey and are not visible in the pdf. No error occurred.

\documentclass[12pt]{report}
\usepackage[top=1in, bottom=1in, left=1in, right=1in]
{geometry}

\usepackage{graphicx}

\usepackage{tablefootnote}

\usepackage{longtable}

\usepackage{float}
\restylefloat{table}

\usepackage{setspace}
\onehalfspacing

\begin{document}


\clearpage 
\pagenumbering{arabic}

\newpage
\chapter{Introduction}
\section{Glioblastoma multiforme}
    \subsection{Epidemiology}
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. 
It is also one of the most common primary brain tumors overall, ranking second after meningiomas. 
In the United States 3.19 individuals per 100,000 were diagnosed with GBM each year, between 2005 and 2009. 
An extrapolation reveals approximately 9,000 new cases per year (Dolecek et al. 2012).  
An earlier study conducted in Switzerland revealed a similar incidence of 3.32 and 2.24 per 100,000 individuals per year between 1980 and 1994, for male and female patients respectively (Ohgaki et al. 2004). 
Although any age group can develop this kind of tumor, the average American is 64 years old when diagnosed with GBM. 
The male to female incidence rate ratio is 1.58. Glioblastoma is also the most aggressive primary brain tumor that holds the worst prognosis of all malignancies of the central nervous system.(Dolecek et al 2012). 
There is no detailed data available on the epidemiology of malignant gliomas in Germany (Robert Koch Institiute 2012).

    Despite great efforts in neurooncological research and a multimodal treatment    approach, patients suffering from glioblastoma have a median survival of 14.6 months (Stupp et al. 2005). 
However, a subgroup of long-term survivors that are believed to constitute 3-5% of all glioblastomas, exceed an overall survival of 36 months (Krex et al. 2007).  


    \subsection{Pathology}
    \subsection{Clinical Presentation}

        \begin{table}[H]
        \centering
        \caption{Presenting symptoms of patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (according to Chang and Parney 2005)}
        \begin{tabular}{p{6cm} c}
        \hline
        Symptom & Percentage of patients experiencing the symptom\\ 
        \hline
        Headache & 57.3\\ 
        Memory loss & 39.2\\
        Cognitive changes & 38.8\\
        Language deficit & 36.2\\
        Motor deficit & 35.9\\
        Personality change & 27.4\\
        Seizure & 23.5\\
        Visual problems & 21.2\\
        Changes in consciousness & 18.3\\
        Nausea/vomiting & 14.8\\
        Sensory deficit & 11.9\\
        Papilledema & 4.6\\
        Other & 18.5\\
        \hline
        \end{tabular}
        \end{table}




    \subsection{Diagnosis}
    \subsection{Treatment} 
\section{Prognostic Markers}
    \subsection{Clinical Factors}
    \subsection{MGMT Promoter Methylation}
    \subsection{IDH-1 Mutation}
    \subsection{Primary and Secondary Glioblastoma}
    \subsection{NogoA and 1p19q Codeletion}
    \subsection{BRAF}
    \subsection{AQP4 Polymorphism}

\end{document}
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Welcome to text.sx! The % character triggers comments, so all text between the % and the next newline is ignored by the compiler. You should enter \% instead to produce the "percent" character. –  T. Verron Apr 30 '13 at 16:09
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1 Answer 1

As stated by T. Verron, % is used for comments. If you want to introduce this symbol, you have to write it \%.

For more information on these special characters, please visit

The Comprehensive LATEX Symbol List

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