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With dsfonts, the square roots don't have the thick bold top bar on some of the symbols as with pxfonts, but with pxfonts, the \int and the other forms \iint all appear vertical whereas with only dsfonts \int in angled.

Is there a way to achieve the square root look of dsfonts and the treatment of \int of pxfonts?

dsfonts alone: (notice the integrals but the square roots is cleaner)

enter image description here

pxfonts alone which also causes errors: (notice the square root but the integrals match)

enter image description here

both fonts:

enter image description here

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I do not get the thicker square-root line when using pxfonts. Did you do something with other packages to make the division line thinner? Are your versions up to date? –  Steven B. Segletes Jun 14 '13 at 15:37
    
@StevenB.Segletes well as you can see, I do. –  dustin Jun 14 '13 at 15:38
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@dustin --- It could be a viewer issue. Try zooming in, or printing out a page. –  Ian Thompson Jun 14 '13 at 15:47
    
@IanThompson it could be but I am sceptical since it only happens to one font class. I like the look of the solution I found online so I think I am going to stick with it for now. –  dustin Jun 14 '13 at 16:26
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Through a lot of searching I found this set up. The only problem is I will have to go through all the pages looking for overlap.

enter image description here

% Euler for math | Palatino for rm | Helvetica for ss | Courier for tt               
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{ppl} % rm                                                  
\linespread{1.05}        % Palatino needs more leading                               
\usepackage[scaled]{helvet} % ss                                                     
\usepackage{courier} % tt                                                            
%\usepackage{euler} % math                                                           
\usepackage{eulervm}
% a better implementation of the euler package (not in gwTeX)                        
\normalfont
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