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I've just started using Palatino for my documents, and I've realized the opening quotes are all rendered as closing quotes. As per the question What is the best way to use quotation mark glyphs I use ``hello'' to quote, but somehow Palatino is always showing both as closed. If I uncomment \usepackage[sc]{mathpazo} then they are rendered correctly. How can I fix this?

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

With a minimal example like:

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage[sc]{mathpazo}
\begin{document}
``text''
\end{document}

I'm getting the following results:

With the standard font:

normal

With [sc]{mathpazo}:

methpazo

As you can see the lines of the quotes point in the same direction in both cases (opening quotes point to the upper right and the closing quotes to the lower left corner) and the opening and closing quotes are different. However with mathpazo they are much similar as with the standard computer modern.

If this is the same result you are getting I guess this is by design with this font and not incorrect. I don't think you can replace just the quotation characters of a font, so if you don't like them you have to use another font.

If you get something different, please post a minimal example (or refer to mine) and post links to the result like I did.

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Wow-- that is what I'm getting. What a strange choice for left quotations! Surely there must be a way to circumvent this... I wouldn't want to change fonts, just when I got used to these! –  Bruno Stonek Feb 25 '11 at 23:43
    
@Bruno: As I said, I don't know how to change just the quotation characters, but another user here might be. You could try to use the csquotes package to define different quotes... –  Martin Scharrer Feb 25 '11 at 23:49
1  
@Bruno: You could define some macro for quotes like \newcommand*\enquote[1]{\textsf{``}#1\textsf{''}} (csquotes already provides a \enquote macro) and then \enquote{text} to get different quotes. You could also switch fonts instead of \textsf. But I doubt that would look good. –  Martin Scharrer Feb 25 '11 at 23:54
1  
If your output is to PDF and you have Acrobat Distiller and a "real" Palatino font installed, then use DVIPS to generate your output. Distiller will replace the mathpazo font with Palatino, which has the expected 66/99 quotation marks. –  Stan Rogers Feb 26 '11 at 0:23
2  
@Stan — the output shown in this answer is a real Palatino design. If distiller is changing the style then it's definitely not using Palatino. –  Will Robertson Feb 26 '11 at 3:30
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Please no! There is no "fixing" here — this is the design of the font. All Palatino-based fonts use this design and to switch just the quotation marks is to some degree a heresy.

Having said that, the Microsoft Palatino knockoff Book Antiqua has a similar look to Palatino but with more convention quotation marks. I don't recommend it, but it might be worth a look.

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And this proves it. –  Caramdir Feb 26 '11 at 4:08
    
@Caramdir — great link! –  Will Robertson Feb 26 '11 at 4:09
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