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Does TikZ have a copy command? the copy command means, e.g.,

I draw a rectangle first, then I draw whatever e.g., circle, writing text etc. in the rectangle. let me define a source object that includes all objects in the rectangle and the rectangle itself. Now I want to copy the source object based on the lower left corner of rectangle to a new position.

@Martin @Jan @Caramdir, following is an example, but it has some error. please also refer to my comment.

\documentclass[titlepage,a4paper]{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage{TikZ}   %Create PostScript and PDF graphics in TeX

\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=0.962661,thick]
  \foreach \xbase/\ybase in {0mm/0mm,46.700000mm/0mm}
  {
    %grid line
    \draw[xstep=11.200000mm,ystep=12.051000mm] (\xbase,\ybase) grid (\xbase + 44.800000mm,\ybase + 36.153000mm);
  }
\end{tikzpicture}

\end{document}

@Martin @Jan @Caramdir, i updated the above example. it is better except that the most left vertical line of right grid is missing.

\documentclass[titlepage,a4paper]{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage{TikZ}   %Create PostScript and PDF graphics in TeX

\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=0.962661,thick]
  \foreach \xbase/\ybase/\xoffset in {0mm/0mm/0mm,44.800000mm/0mm/1.9mm}
  {
    %grid line
    \draw[xstep=11.200000mm,ystep=12.051000mm,xshift=\xoffset] (\xbase,\ybase) grid (\xbase + 44.800000mm,\ybase + 36.153000mm);
  }
 \end{tikzpicture}

 \end{document}

it seemed that grid always uses the origin (0,0) as its reference. my way is to add shift to the base point and cares about the coordinates by myself. but the most left vertical line of right grid is missing. i don't know why. it looked like that the line should be in the range of the grid.

is there a rationale for this? i mean make grid use (x,y) instead of (0,0) as the reference point.

share|improve this question
    
Related question: "How to rotate as copied in tikz" –  Martin Scharrer Feb 26 '11 at 12:25
    
@Martin thank you for your direction. after reading the link, foreach loop seems a solution. define the base point and new position points in loop variable, then draw everything in loop body. –  warem Feb 26 '11 at 13:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Other than using the \foreach command or defining a new command, you may repeat pictures by at least two other ways. (solution to the grid problem is found at the end of my answer)

1- (not tikz specific) : use the \newsavebox, \savebox and \usebox commands. The advantage of savebox is that the picture is not redrawn everytime it is called. For example:

\documentclass{minimal}

\usepackage{tikz}

\begin{document}

\newsavebox{\test}
\savebox{\test}{\tikz \draw[red] (0,0) circle (1cm);}

\begin{tikzpicture}
\draw (0,0) node {\usebox{\test}};
\draw (7,0) node {\usebox{\test}};
\end{tikzpicture}


\end{document}

2- (tikz specific) Use the object-oriented capabilities of tikz and pgf. The details are found in the tikz manual. For example, the code found on page 554 of the manual:

\documentclass{minimal}

\usepackage{tikz}
\usepgfmodule{oo}

\begin{document}

\pgfooclass{stamp}{ % This is the class stamp
    \method stamp() { % The constructor 
    }
    \method apply(#1,#2) { % Causes the stamp to be shown at coordinate (#1,#2)
        %Draw the stamp:
        \node [rotate=20] at (#1,#2) {Passed};
    }
}
\pgfoonew \mystamp=new stamp()
\begin{tikzpicture}
        \mystamp.apply(1,2)
        \mystamp.apply(3,4)
\end{tikzpicture}

\end{document}

About the grid problem. I don't have a good explanation about why the problem is occurring other than the shift in coordinates isn't being treated by tikz the way you expect them to (not much of an explanation I admit). A good way to solve the problem is to use the scope environment, and shift the whole environment, as described by the following code (I somewhat simplified your loop to make the scope environment stand out):

\begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1,thick]
  \foreach \xoffset in {0,5.2}
  {
    \begin{scope}[shift={(\xoffset,0)}]
        \draw[xstep=1,ystep=1] (0,0) grid (5,5);
    \end{scope}
  }
\end{tikzpicture}

The scope environment acts as box that may be moved around (shifted or rotated) as a whole. If you are familiar with pstricks, it is similar to the \rput command.

share|improve this answer
    
your two method both worked. i prefer to the first method because i program with pure c (not at all c++). but, comparing with \foreach command or defining a new command, which one is better or more efficient? on the other hand, could you please have a look at the question about grid in my original example? –  warem Mar 1 '11 at 5:24
    
@warem: I added a solution to your grid problem : use the scope environment. –  Frédéric Mar 1 '11 at 6:15
    
thanks alot. scope worked. –  warem Mar 1 '11 at 6:38

If I had to use the same contents several times in different places, I would define a new tex command that draws all the objects, and then use it at different locations, possibly with scope and shifting. Something like this:

\newcommand\mytikzcontents{
  \draw (0,0) rectangle (4,5);
  \draw (1,1) circle (1cm);
  \draw[dashed,->] (4,5) -- (1,1);
}

and then inside the tikzpicture I would use it as

\begin{scope}[xshift=2cm,yshift=3cm]
   \mytikzcontents
\end{scope}

Or you could make the xshift and yshift arguments of the command.

share|improve this answer
    
i just start to learn tikz. now i don't know what scope means. i will refer it to pgfmanual. your method is similar to foreach loop i think. it is a good idea to define a new command to draw the source objects then use it wherever i want. thank you. –  warem Feb 26 '11 at 14:55
    
@warem: The scope basically passes its options to all the drawing commands inside the scope (plus it localizes clipping). –  Caramdir Feb 26 '11 at 16:26
    
@Martin @Jan @Caramdir i added an example in the original text. it drew two girds which are exactly same. the left one's lower left corner is (0,0), the right one's is (46.7,0). there is a gap between the two girds. the gap is 1.9. but the right grid omit the gap. it is something about coordinate transformation. but the commad grid always counted on from (0,0). –  warem Feb 28 '11 at 12:05
    
@Martin @Jan @Caramdir i updated the example in the original text. please check it. –  warem Mar 1 '11 at 3:54

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