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I am looking for a certain symbol. It looks like // but closer together and in mathematics refers to a GIT quotient. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

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1  
Welcome to TeX.SX! :) – clemens Aug 4 '13 at 19:29
3  
The Wikipedia page to GIT uses /\!\!/, i.e. two slashes with kerning. – Qrrbrbirlbel Aug 4 '13 at 19:33
1  
Have a look at “How to look up a symbol?” for ideas how you can easily find a particular symbol. – Henri Menke Aug 4 '13 at 20:44
up vote 13 down vote accepted

The stmaryrd package offers you \sslash:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{stmaryrd}

\begin{document}

${\displaystyle A\sslash B}\quad
A\sslash B\quad
L_{A\sslash B}\quad
L_{M_{A\sslash B}}$

\end{document}

enter image description here

As egreg mentions, one can also define the symbols without extra packages:

\documentclass{article}

\newcommand{\sslash}{\mathbin{/\mkern-6mu/}}

\begin{document}

${\displaystyle A\sslash B}\quad
A\sslash B\quad
L_{A\sslash B}\quad
L_{M_{A\sslash B}}$

\end{document}

enter image description here

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3  
The same result, without extra packages, can be obtained by \newcommand{\sslash}{\mathbin{/\mkern-6mu/}} – egreg Aug 4 '13 at 21:36
    
@egreg I've incorporated your suggestion to my answer. Thanks. – Gonzalo Medina Aug 4 '13 at 21:51
    
Thanks, Gonzalo and @egreg! – Tyler Kelly Aug 7 '13 at 0:20
    
@egreg: Why do you define it to be a binary operator? Actually I came to your answer since I was trying to understand what is the best way of writing a quotient, and I realize that / is really awful (both in term of spacing and since / is of class 0), but that \mathchar"113D looks better than \mathchar"213D. Besides, it seems more logical to me, since I usually think at "A modulo B" being an operation that I perform on A rather than as a relation between A and B. What am I missing? Thanks. – Filippo Alberto Edoardo Nov 12 '15 at 17:39
1  
@FilippoAlbertoEdoardo It's a problem of spacing; the fraction slash has traditionally been treated without spaces on either side. So it's classified as an ordinary symbol. However, this particular case seems a bit different from the slash and I think \mathbin is better; of course one should know what's the usual way to render it. Using \mathop is out of the question. – egreg Nov 12 '15 at 18:43

Here is a slightly more versatile version called \git that adapts to the style you're in:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\newcommand{\git}{\mathbin{
  \mathchoice{/\mkern-6mu/}% \displaystyle
    {/\mkern-6mu/}% \textstyle
    {/\mkern-5mu/}% \scriptstyle
    {/\mkern-5mu/}}}% \scriptscriptstyle
\begin{document}
${\displaystyle A\git B}\quad
  A\git B\quad
  L_{A\git B}\quad
  L_{M_{A\git B}}$
\end{document}
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