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I would like to style my document in such a way that the page is divided into four equal parts and then the text is printed in those pages: it is similar to twocolumn but I also want to have, say two rows. The reason is that I would like to cut the page into four smaller pieces, so it would be very convenient if LaTeX can do this. Thank you in advance for help!

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5  
Very much related: Is there a way to get two pages in one with latex? –  Hendrik Vogt Mar 9 '11 at 14:54
    
Thanks. But I do not want to do this to an external PDF file, but rather to my own file. Also, I prefer if the font sizes do not change. The documentation for pdfpages is very brief, so I am not sure if I can do this. –  user1227 Mar 9 '11 at 17:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could simply use pdfnup (for PDF documents), or psnup (for PostScript documents).

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We can also generalize this advice to "use external tools". There are many dedicated utilities, most PDF/PS viewers allow setting this in printing options, and finally, many printer drivers/software themselves provide such functions. –  Andrey Vihrov Mar 9 '11 at 14:53

The most flexible solution to this problem that I know of is pgfpages. It's an interface to TeX's shipout algorithms. You can place as many pages of any size you want on each page. It's documented in the PGF manual, albeit lightly. Have a look at the source files that come with beamer to see how it's used and also this very popular post from Guido Diepen's blog: “Creating latex-beamer handouts with notes”

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Building on Matthew Leingang's answer, here's some code that does 4 on 1.

\usepackage{pgfpages}
\pgfpagesuselayout{4 on 1}[a4paper,border shrink=5mm]

Put this somewhere in your preamble. (After hyperref, if you load hyperref).

This will put 4 pages on one. If you want to keep more or less the same text size, I'd suggest upping the text size in your documentclass call. With a little experimentation you should be able to find a size that looks acceptable.

Here's a quick MWE to show roughly how this may work.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{anyfontsize} %For arbitrary font sizes
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}  
\usepackage{lipsum}  % For dummy text
\usepackage[margin=1cm]{geometry} % To make margins smaller
\usepackage{microtype}  % To improve hyphenation, justification etc...
\usepackage{pgfpages}
\pgfpagesuselayout{4 on 1}[a4paper,border shrink=5mm]

\begin{document}
\fontsize{20}{24} \selectfont
 \lipsum

{\Huge Here is larger text}

\lipsum
\end{document}

LaTeX doesn't allow just any old font size in the documentclass call, so I've had to get around that with explicitly giving a fontsize at the begining. (This means that the page numbers are relatively very small now...)

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