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The skeleton of my document is:

\documentclass[11pt]{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,textcomp,amssymb,geometry,graphicx}

\begin{document}
\maketitle

\section*{1.}

\begin{itemize}
\item[(a)]
\item[(b)]
\end{itemize}

\section*{2.}

\begin{itemize}
\item[(a)]
\item[(b)]
\end{itemize}

\section*{3.}

\begin{itemize}
\item[(a)]
\item[(b)]
\end{itemize}

\end{document}

I want each section to be on a separate page. How do I do that?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

why

\section*{1.}

rather than

\section{}

In LaTeX it's almost always better to let LaTeX do the numbering.

However in either case

\let\oldsection\section
\renewcommand\section{\clearpage\oldsection}

will add the page break.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure why it's \section*{1.}. I just copied this code from someone... Do I add your code snippet to the preamble? – Frank Epps Sep 1 '13 at 0:58
1  
@FrankEpps it's a bad style, it disables the latex cross referencing mechanism as latex doesn't "know" the number and of course it means if you edit in a new section you have to renumber the whole document by hand. – David Carlisle Sep 1 '13 at 1:01
    
@FrankEpps yes adding that to the preamble should work – David Carlisle Sep 1 '13 at 1:02

Here's another option using \sectionbreak from the titlesec package:

\documentclass[11pt]{article}
\usepackage{titlesec}

\titleclass{\section}{top}
\newcommand\sectionbreak{\clearpage}

\title{Title}
\author{Author}

\begin{document}
\maketitle

\section{Test section one}
\section{Test section two}
\section{Test section three}
\section{Test section four}

\end{document}
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