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I would like to use the Concrete Math font in LaTeX, which is a bitmap font. The rendering with pdflatex is naturally poor-quality with jagged edges.

My solution so far has been to generate a DVI file and then convert to PDF using Linux's dvipdf. This tool effectively traces and smooths the edges of the glyphs and the end result is beautiful. However, using the DVI output format (with latex) causes a host of other problems with including figures, etc. For instance, you can't include .png or .pdf figures when using plain LaTeX.

Is there a way to somehow get the same bitmap font-smoothing effect in pdflatex? or via an intermediate format that still allows you to include at least .png figures?

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Sep 8 '13 at 15:18

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can set up in order that Metafont uses a high resolution device for producing the fonts; this should be run with pdflatex.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{concrete}

% MF mode dpdfezzz is for 8000dpi
\pdfpkmode{dpdfezzz}
\pdfpkresolution=8000

\begin{document}
\noindent
Some test text with\\
\textit{italic} and \textsl{slanted}.
\end{document}

Here's what appears on my screen at almost maximum zoom

enter image description here

You see that there's no jagged letter. Compare with what's obtained when the resolution and mode are the default

enter image description here

Load the images on a separate browser window or tab and maximize them to see the full comparison.

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