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I can find collections for chess, cards, etc. But could not locate a religious fonts collection.

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3  
What do you mean by religious fonts? Like crosses? –  Francis Sep 11 '13 at 21:03
    
@Francis yes, crosses, David's star etc. I can find individual ones by searching for "cross" in the comprehensive list, but cannot find a collection. What goes for crescent symbol or other symbols. –  Maesumi Sep 11 '13 at 21:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you’re using XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX, you can use any Unicode symbol you like – provided that your font has it. The font Segoe UI Symbol (which is a Windows system font I think), for instance, supports a decent portion of the symbols listed at Cultural, political, and religious symbols in Unicode on Wikipedia:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
%\setmainfont{Arial Unicode MS}% also not bad
\setmainfont{Segoe UI Symbol}
\begin{document}\Huge
࿕ ࿖ ࿗ ࿘ Ⓐ ☘ ☠ ☥ ☦ ☧ ☨ ☩ ☪ ☫ ☬ ☭ ☮ ☯ ☸ ☹ ☺ ☻ ♡ ♥ ♰ ♱
⚜ ⛤ ⛥ ⛦ ⛧ ✊ ✌ ✝ ✞ ✟ ✠ ✡ ❤ ⸙ 卍 卐 ﷲ 🍀 🍁 🎯 👊 👌 👍
👎 💀 💋 💔 💘 💡 💯 🗻 🗼 🗽 🗿 🕆 🕇 🕈 🕊
\end{document}

output

Since you were asking for a collection in particular, I’d point you to the aforementioned Wikipedia article. If you’re looking for a specific symbol, check out search sites like http://www.unicode-table.com or http://www.isthisthingon.org/unicode, which also provide character tables – there’s specifically the Unicode section U+2626 – U+262F Religious and political symbols. Finally, if you’re looking for a font with broad Unicode support, Wikipedia saves the day once again with the articles (List of) Unicode fonts and List of Typefaces – Unicode fonts.

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The standard package pifont provides three Christian-style crosses and the Star of David. I could do with a crescent for Islam, as well, and some other things but am not sure where to find them right now:

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{pifont}
\begin{document}
  \ding{61} \ding{62} \ding{63} \ding{65}
\end{document}

religious dings

wasysym offers an alternative \davidsstar:

<code>wasysym</code> Star of David

bbding offers crosses and Stars of David but only in metafont format.

marvosym enables multiple symbol commands, including \Cross \Ankh \CeltCross \Yinyang:

<code>marvosym</code> religious symbols

I find it rather odd I can't find anything for Islam given the range of symbols in the Comprehensive list. Am I looking wrong?

Update

Anyway, in case anybody has a use for them, I post the following tikz pics which can be used to create two varieties of cross, a Star of David and a crescent/star symbol. Each pic requires a single argument corresponding to the size.

\documentclass[tikz]{standalone}
\begin{document}

  \tikzset{
    croes0/.pic={%
      \draw [line width=.2*#1, inner sep=0pt, pic actions] (0,.5*#1) -- (0,-.5*#1) (-.3*#1,.2*#1) -- (.3*#1,.2*#1);\
    },
    croes/.pic={%
      \draw [line width=.1*#1, inner sep=0pt, pic actions] (.075*#1,.45*#1) |- (.25*#1,.25*#1) |- (.075*#1,.1*#1) |- (-.075*#1,-.45*#1) |- (-.25*#1,.1*#1) |- (-.075*#1,.25*#1) -| (-.075*#1,.45*#1) -- cycle;
    },
    seren2/.pic={%
      \node (cylch seren) [circle, line width=0pt, inner sep=0pt, minimum size=#1] {};
      \foreach \i in {90, -54, -126, 18, 162}
      \coordinate (seren\i) at (node cs:name=cylch seren, angle=\i);
      \draw [fill, pic actions] (seren-126) -- (seren90) -- (seren-54) -- (seren162) -- (seren18)  -- cycle;
    },
    seren/.pic={%
      \node (cylch seren) [circle, line width=.1*#1, inner sep=0pt, minimum size=#1] {};
      \foreach \i in {90, -30, -150, -90, 30, 150}
      \coordinate (seren\i) at (node cs:name=cylch seren, angle=\i);
      \draw [line width=.1*#1, pic actions] (seren90) -- (seren-30) -- (seren-150) -- cycle (seren-90) -- (seren30) -- (seren150) -- cycle;
    },
    cilgant seren/.pic={%
      \path [fill, even odd rule, line width=.1*#1, pic actions] circle [radius=.5*#1] {} [xshift=.1*#1, draw=white, line width=.01*#1] circle [radius=.4*#1] {};
      \pic at (.5*#1,0) {seren2=.4*#1};
    },
  }

  \begin{tikzpicture}
    \pic [red] at (0,0) {croes0=12.5pt};
    \pic [orange] at (.5,0) {croes=12.5pt};
    \pic [green] at (1,0) {seren=10pt};
    \pic [blue] at (1.5,0) {cilgant seren=10pt};
  \end{tikzpicture}

\end{document}

Faith in <code>tikz</code>

EDIT

Do NOT name your pics. That is, do NOT write something like \pic (pic name) [blue] {cilgant seren=10pt}; else the symbol will NOT be drawn correctly. I'm not sure why this is, but it certainly is for at least some of the symbols such as the crescent-star. Since there is no point in naming them, not doing so is the obvious solution.

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it depends, what do you expect with religious fonts. At How to make a cross symbol in LaTeX there are some crosses from marvosym.

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