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I need to recreate this in LaTeX:

three-column section

The rest of the page is "normal", i.e. no division into columns. I have both images as separate files. What would you suggest? Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are many ways of doing the above. The following in my opinion provides better control over layouts.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{pgf}

\usepackage[a4paper,landscape]{geometry}

\pagestyle{empty}

\begin{document}

\begin{minipage}[c]{0.25\textwidth}
  \begin{center}
    \pgfimage[width=\textwidth]{fleft}
  \end{center}
\end{minipage}
\begin{minipage}[c]{0.4\textwidth}
  \begin{center}
    \LARGE {\itshape Accidental computational linguist}\\ 

    de facto web developer\\

    {\bfseries aspiring super user}
  \end{center}

\end{minipage}
\begin{minipage}[c]{0.25\textwidth}
  \begin{center}
    \pgfimage[width=\textwidth]{fright}
  \end{center}
\end{minipage}

\end{document}

Here is the result.

enter image description here

Definitely you will want to tweak with the minipage widths and their placement options ([c][b][t]), font selections, text line gaps, and other similar issues, but I am sure you can figure that out.

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2  
Is there any benefits to using \pgfimage over \includegraphics? –  Torbjørn T. Sep 13 '13 at 6:03
    
@TorbjørnT. None that I am aware of. I have the personal habit of using \pgfimage, since I use Beamer a lot. But any user may want to use \includegraphics if one opts to. –  Masroor Sep 13 '13 at 6:08
    
Fantastic, thanks @MMA –  John J. Camilleri Sep 13 '13 at 6:43

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