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I had to cross out a sentence and I did it the following way, which is kinda sloppy.

$ \rlap{\textbf{-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------}}%
{\mbox{Its derivative should be}}$ $2z + 2\bar{z} =4Re[z]$ So are its critical points all over the real axis? 

is there a better way to do this and get the same result?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Use the either the ulem package or the soul package.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[normalem]{ulem} % either use this (simple) or
\usepackage{soul} % use this (many fancier options)
\begin{document}

% ulem command
\sout{Its derivative should be $2z + 2\bar{z} =4Re[z]$ So are its critical points all over the real axis?} 

% soul command
\st{Its derivative should be $2z + 2\bar{z} =4Re[z]$ So are its critical points all over the real axis?} 
\end{document}

output of code

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+1 for ulem. It also provides \xout to put XXX over the text (see this answer for an image.) and allows you to design your own pattern. (soul might be able to to the same and more, but I don't know it) –  Martin Scharrer Mar 17 '11 at 10:09
    
Note that ulem changes the behavior of emph. In order to avoid it, add \normalem to the preamble after the package insertion. –  Dror Mar 17 '11 at 13:31
3  
That's why I added [normalem] as a package option in the example document. That has the same effect as adding \normalem into the preamble. –  Alan Munn Mar 17 '11 at 13:36
1  
I tried both solutions, and my preference goes to ulem because its \sout command can handle "special" characters (such as é, è, à, ...) commonly used in some languages, whereas \st fails. –  Anthony Labarre Oct 16 '12 at 8:05
    
@AnthonyLabarre Interesting observation, I'd never noticed that. soul will work with accented characters if you are using LuaTeX or XeTeX, though. –  Alan Munn Oct 16 '12 at 15:07

You can also use PDF annotations with the pdfcomment package. Then you can also add a comment/note.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\usepackage{pdfcomment}
\begin{document}
\pdfmarkupcomment[markup=StrikeOut,color=red,author=Approximist]{Its derivative should be $2z + 2\bar{z} =4Re[z]$ So are its critical points all over the real axis?}{comment}
\end{document}

\pdfmarkupcomment example

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Looks nice, but it only works under Adobe Reader, right? And thus not under any Linux distribution. Or is there some way to make the comment show up in a pdf reader in Linux? –  Adriaan Dec 17 at 14:38
    
It works with every viewer that implements PDF! OTOH, there are viewers, which promise to be PDF viewers, ... Sorry, but i've lost passion and interest to be up to date with this mess –  Josef 2 days ago
    
I understand that can be quite a hassle. I can tell you that Evince does not seem not show the 'comment box', but Okular does, under Ubuntu 14.10 at least ;). –  Adriaan 2 days ago

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