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For some reasons I have to install a 64-bit RPM based Linux (Fedora or SUSE) beside a 32-bit Debian-based Linux (Ubuntu or Arch) on my machine.

I want to use same TeXLive Installation from both OSs. Am I able to introduce the texmf directory of Ubuntu (/usr/local/.../texmf-dist?) to Fedora or vice versa? How?

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Did you installed TeXLive manually or is it the one provided by Fedora or SuSE distribution? A manually installed TeXLive would be much easier to share. –  Martin Scharrer Mar 18 '11 at 12:45
    
@Martin: I installed from .iso image. –  sorush-r Mar 18 '11 at 12:52
    
You mean the TeXLive ISO image? –  Martin Scharrer Mar 18 '11 at 12:59
    
@Martin: yes :-) –  sorush-r Mar 18 '11 at 13:05

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should be able to share the texmf-dist directory between different OSs. If you install TeXLive manually using the official installer than there shouldn't be a problem. However, if you install it using the Linux packages provided by the distributions problems might occur when one wants to update the LaTeX packages there. Only sharing texmf-dist seems to be a good idea so that the binaries are kept separated. However, this is not really necessary because 32-bit and 64-bit are AFAIK kept separately in different subfolders of bin/.

You need to install TeXLive on one distribution. Then you mount the partition where /usr/local is located under the other distribution (e.g. to /mount/otherdistri) and either create an symbolic link from /usr/local/.../texmf-dist to /mount/otherdistri/usr/local/.../texmf-dist or use

mount --bind /mount/otherdistri/usr/local/.../texmf-dist /usr/local/.../texmf-dist

to virtually mount the directory there. You can place these mount instructions into the /etc/fstab config file.

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