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How to write the above using Latex ?

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2  
You are searching for the cases environment from »amsmath«. –  Thorsten Donig Nov 19 '13 at 8:26
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Welcome to TeX.SX! You can have a look at our starter guide to familiarize yourself further with our format. –  Jubobs Nov 19 '13 at 8:30
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You might also be interested in: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/115360/… [It deals with the same mathematical equation (-; ] –  jmc Nov 19 '13 at 8:49
    
@Jubobs Thanks for your welcome. –  Suman Nov 19 '13 at 15:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use cases environment from amsmath package.

The code that illustrates how to do it is

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
  \[
    P_v(E/k,T) =
                 \begin{cases}
                    1       & \text{if $T\geq 0$} \\
                    0       & \text{if $T = 0$} \\
                    -1      & \text{if $T\rightarrow\infty$}
                 \end{cases}
 \]
\end{document}
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\text{if $T\geq 0$} is even better. The infinity symbol's name is \infty. –  egreg Nov 19 '13 at 9:12
    
@egreg: Thank you very much for your comment! I have just edited my answer! –  Thanos Nov 19 '13 at 11:23
\documentclass[preview,border=12pt,12pt]{standalone}% change it back to your own document class
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{array}
\begin{document}
\[P_v(E/k,T)=
\begin{cases}
1-a_vT+N_{k/Q}(v)T^2, & \mbox{good reduction} \\
1-T, & \mbox{split multicative reduction}\\
1+T, & \mbox{non split multicative reduction}\\
1, & \mbox{aditive reduction}
\end{cases}
\]
\end{document}

Out put will look like enter image description here

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1  
With mathtools package you have the cases* environment which sets the second column in text mode, so you don't have to write —in this case— \mbox{…}. –  Manuel Nov 19 '13 at 9:08
2  
@Manuel cases* is available only with mathtools. Instead of \mbox I'd use \text. –  egreg Nov 19 '13 at 9:11
    
@egreg Isn't that what I said? :) And I also use \text, but I don't know in what cases I should use \mbox? –  Manuel Nov 19 '13 at 9:23
    
\text will also give same output as \mbox, and I don't know the real difference between this two command. –  Apurba Nov 19 '13 at 12:52
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\text adapts to the surrounding text style. If you are in a theorem with the font set in sans serif, italics and small caps (if that exists :D), then if you use \text you will get that same style. –  Manuel Nov 20 '13 at 12:01

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