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I am using XeLaTeX together with biblatex. I am typesetting a table where a citation goes into one of the column headers, namely I put \citet{ref1} into the table.

ref1 has two authors and normally the citation AuthorA and AuthorB (2013) looks fine in the text; however, in the table it is too wide so I was hoping to force biblatex to shorten it to AuthorA et al. (2013).

Is there a way to do that? Note that I do not want to do it document-wide, only within the particular table.

NOTE: Using \citeauthor produces both names.

MWE

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[style=authoryear-comp, natbib=true, backend=biber, sorting=nyt, autolang=hyphen]{biblatex}

\begin{filecontents}{literature.bib}
@ARTICLE{ref1,
  AUTHOR = {AuthorA, A. and AuthorB, B.},
  JOURNALTITLE = {{Journal of Testing}},
  PAGES = {1--2},
  TITLE = {{Test Reference}},
  VOLUME = 1,
  NUMBER = 1,
  YEAR = 2013
}
\end{filecontents}
\addbibresource{literature.bib}

\begin{document}

\citet{ref1}

\end{document}
share|improve this question
    
The abbreviation et al. means et alii, which is Latin for and others (plural). Using it for a single co-author doesn't seem right to me. –  Marc van Dongen Dec 13 '13 at 11:10
    
@MarcvanDongen: There aren't many ways to shorten the author list so this has to do. –  Up-and-coming LaTeX Mastah Dec 13 '13 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The following does the trick:

\AtNextCitekey{\defcounter{maxnames}{1}}\citet{ref1}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. This indeed is the right trick. But I wonder why there is not a maxcitenames counter... –  karlkoeller Dec 13 '13 at 8:10
    
Perhaps this could be a feature request. –  Oleg Domanov Dec 13 '13 at 9:14

If you don't need to have natbib=true then the command \citeauthor* does exactly that.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[style=authoryear-comp, backend=biber, sorting=nyt, autolang=hyphen]{biblatex}

\begin{filecontents}{literature.bib}
@ARTICLE{ref1,
  AUTHOR = {AuthorA, A. and AuthorB, B.},
  JOURNALTITLE = {{Journal of Testing}},
  PAGES = {1--2},
  TITLE = {{Test Reference}},
  VOLUME = 1,
  NUMBER = 1,
  YEAR = 2013
}
\end{filecontents}
\addbibresource{literature.bib}

\begin{document}

\citeauthor*{ref1} 

\citeauthor{ref1}

\end{document} 

Output:

enter image description here


EDIT

For what it's worth, I've discovered that with natbib=true and maxcitenames=1

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[style=authoryear-comp, natbib=true, maxcitenames=1, backend=biber, sorting=nyt, autolang=hyphen]{biblatex}

\begin{filecontents}{literature.bib}
@ARTICLE{ref1,
  AUTHOR = {AuthorA, A. and AuthorB, B.},
  JOURNALTITLE = {{Journal of Testing}},
  PAGES = {1--2},
  TITLE = {{Test Reference}},
  VOLUME = 1,
  NUMBER = 1,
  YEAR = 2013
}
\end{filecontents}
\addbibresource{literature.bib}

\begin{document}

\citeauthor*{ref1}

\citeauthor{ref1}

\end{document}

you get

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Could the part about natbib compatibility impact on the recent 'is there any downside to this option' question? –  Joseph Wright Dec 13 '13 at 7:16
    
I upvoted the answer because it would have helped, but unfortunately at this stage into the writing process I can no longer give up natbib commands. –  Up-and-coming LaTeX Mastah Dec 13 '13 at 7:59
    
@Up-and-comingLaTeXMastah Thank you. I'll leave the answer, since it could be helpful to someone else. :-) –  karlkoeller Dec 13 '13 at 8:14
    
@Joseph Forgive my poor understanding of English, but I really don't know what you mean –  karlkoeller Dec 13 '13 at 9:09
    
@karlkoeller In your answer here you say 'If you don't need to have natbib=true', so I wondered if there is a link to tex.stackexchange.com/questions/149313/…? –  Joseph Wright Dec 13 '13 at 9:33

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