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In WYSIWYG editors you press the return key to start a new section. In HTML terms a section of a text would be between <p><\p>. So what is the proper way to do the same in TEX?

I know there is \section. But how to section text of such section properly.

Example:

Desired Output:

  1. Title

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam

    erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren,

    no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam

So there is a section with title Title which holds a text which is separeted in three (abstract) sections.

Is it the proper way to wrap \begin{flushleft}...\end{flushleft} around each section? Or is there a more elegant way?

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3  
An empty line signifies a paragraph break. –  Torbjørn T. Dec 20 '13 at 13:34
    
Oh, okay didn't know that, thank you. Feeling bit stupid now. –  arminb Dec 20 '13 at 13:37
    
@arminb: Since you have some responses below that seem to answer your question, please consider marking one of them as ‘Accepted’ by clicking on the tickmark below their vote count (see How do you accept an answer?). This shows which answer helped you most, and it assigns reputation points to the author of the answer (and to you!). It's part of this site's idea to identify good questions and answers through upvotes and acceptance of answers. –  Tobi Jan 8 at 1:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The general way to end a paragraph is to add an empty line in the source:

This is a paragraph. And then some more text so that it extends over more than one line in the PDF.

This is a second paragraph.

There is also a TeX primitive \par that does the same, but an empty line is a much clearer way of denoting paragraph breaks in the text, so at least in the general text I would use that. In definitions of macros and environments \par can be useful.

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
This is a paragraph. And then some more text so that it extends over more than one line in the PDF.

This is a second paragraph.\par This is a third paragraph, but the paragraph break is a little `hidden'.
\end{document}

enter image description here

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In addition to Torbjørn’s answer: There are some ways to change how LaTeX deals with such paragraphs in the output.

change length registers

There are two lengths influencing the format of paragraph begins: 1. \parindent tells how much the first line of each paragraph is indented (except this following a sectioning macro, like \section) and 2. \parskip holds the vertical space before a new paragraph starts. both can be modified with \setlength:

\documentclass{article}

\setlength{\parindent}{0pt}
\setlength{\parskip}{\baselineskip}% \baselineskip = distance bewteen two baselines

\begin{document}
This is a paragraph. And then some more text so that it extends over more than one line in the PDF.

This is a second paragraph.\par This is a third paragraph, but the paragraph break is a little `hidden'.
\end{document}

parskip

package parskip

The parskip basically does the same as above, but sets a noter value for \parskip.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{parskip}

\begin{document}
This is a paragraph. And then some more text so that it extends over more than one line in the PDF.

This is a second paragraph.\par This is a third paragraph, but the paragraph break is a little `hidden'.
\end{document}

class options

Some classes provide similar functionality. The Koma-Script classes have the option parskip=no/half/full (see manual for more), e.g.

\documentclass[parskip=full]{scrartcl}

This will also set the indention to zero.

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