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I wonder if I should put the \noindent command immediately after enumerations, itemization, and especially after descriptions. For instance:

\begin{itemize}
  \item One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams...
\end{itemize}

\noindent He lay on his armour-like back...

I saw that formatting style in a paper long ago, and ever since I've been using that style. However, now I wonder whether it is really such a good idea.

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up vote 14 down vote accepted

This is really a question of whether the text is part of the same paragraph or not. If it is, then I'd miss out the blank line in the source and LaTeX will sort out the indents automatically:

\begin{itemize}
  \item One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams...
\end{itemize}
He lay on his armour-like back...

On the other hand, if the following text starts a new paragraph then it should be indented (assuming that this is the style you are using over all).

\begin{itemize}
  \item One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams...
\end{itemize}

He lay on his armour-like back ...
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7  
+1 for Kafka. We need a replacement for lipsum that defines macros that set kafka stories: \metamorphosis –  Seamus Apr 7 '11 at 8:29
    
Am I the only one who thinks that this is kinda not logical? Wouldn't it make more sense if an empty line would lead to a non-indented, "brand new" new paragraph (like at the beginning of a section) and the absence of an empty line would make it an "ordinary" new paragraph? –  Christoph Jul 26 '12 at 11:56
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