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How can I use small caps with the CMSS font? When trying to set fontshape to "sc" I get a serif font or just no change (if I use fonthshapealone):

result of example below:
screenshot

\documentclass[11pt]{scrartcl}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage[latin1]{inputenc}


\usepackage[T1]{fontenc} 
\newcommand{\changefont}[3]{\fontfamily{#1}\fontseries{#2}\fontshape{#3}\selectfont}

\newcommand{\Ena}[1]{{\changefont{cmss}{m}{sc}#1}} %Eigennamen
\newcommand{\Enb}[1]{{\fontshape{sc}#1}} %Eigennamen


\begin{document}

\changefont{cmss}{m}{n} 
Normal Text and \Ena{Text with Small Caps} or \Enb{Text with Small Caps}

\end{document}
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As far as I know neither the cmss nor lmss family has a small caps font. –  Ulrike Fischer Apr 27 '11 at 10:58
1  
Thanks for your comment! Is it unusual (or typographically "bad") to use small caps with Sans Serif fonts or what is the reason that they just don't exist? –  Martin Apr 27 '11 at 11:16
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think CMSS simply doesn't have smallcaps; not very many sans-serif fonts do. Somebody with the appropriate MetaFONT-Fu could probably make some, either for Computer Modern or for Latin Modern.

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1  
Is it unusual (or typographically "bad") to use small caps with Sans Serif fonts or what is the reason that they just don't exist? –  Martin Apr 27 '11 at 11:15
    
Small caps are most often used in normal paragraph text when there are lots of initials being used, e.g. "The computer system for the WTO was supplied by IBM." Since most paragraph text is set with serif fonts, there's less of a need for sans-serif fonts with small caps. In addition, small caps are usually only provided in "professional" typefaces since the letters actually have to be redesigned and not just scaled down. There's nothing "bad" about using them, however. –  beerbajay Sep 18 '12 at 19:04
    
@beerbajay I know font designers who would vehemently disagree with the claim that there is nothing 'bad' about such designs ;). –  cfr Apr 15 at 1:34
    
@cfr It's generally considered "bad" to typeset paragraphs with sans-serif fonts, but that's exactly what we're doing almost everywhere on the web. The argument for small caps must hold for both serif and sans- text once you've already taken the step of setting paragraphs in sans-? –  beerbajay Apr 15 at 7:21
    
@beerbajay Maybe. I'm not sure. Since I tend to use small-caps for section headings and those are often set in sans-serif, that hadn't occurred to me. [I use serif small-caps - not sans - but I'm just thinking about it.] I think you'd have to ask the font designers. (But they are designing partly for the web so I wonder if there is a further objection.) –  cfr Apr 15 at 14:22
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May be mine is not a good work around, but was enough for me as a patch for the lettrine package. I patched it with \scalebox and writing in capital letters:

...
\newcommand{\Enc}[1]{\scalebox{0.8}{#1}}
...
Normal Text and \Ena{Text with Small Caps} or \Enb{Text with Small Caps} or  T\Enb{EXT WITH SMALL CAPS}
...
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Welcome to TeX.SX! –  Torbjørn T. Nov 11 '13 at 17:40
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