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I need to make a equation like this

      1011   (this is 11 in decimal)
    x 1110   (this is 14 in decimal)
    ======
      0000   (this is 1011 x 0)
     1011    (this is 1011 x 1, shifted one position to the left)
    1011     (this is 1011 x 1, shifted two positions to the left)
 + 1011      (this is 1011 x 1, shifted three positions to the left)
 =========
  10011010   (this is 154 in decimal)

I tried to code like this

\begin{equation}
\frac{
    \frac{
        \begin{array}[b]{r}
                1011    \\
            \times 1110
        \end{array}
        }
        {
    \begin{array}[b]{r}
        0000    \\
        0000    \\
        0000    \\
        + 0000
    \end{array}
    }
}
{
10011010
}
\end{equation}

But the result is not aligned.

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
5  
Welcome to TeX.SX! This might be useful: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/11702/… –  Adam Liter Apr 6 at 4:17
    
Welcome to the TeX.SX! Could you please extend your example to a minimum (working) example starting with \documentclass... and ending with ...\end{document}, it would help the solvers a lot to start working on it. –  Malipivo Apr 6 at 6:14
    
Do you need also the annotations? –  egreg Apr 6 at 9:41
    
shouldn't the {calculations} tag be added ? –  jfbu Apr 6 at 13:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The following is inspired by Robert Fuster's answer. (I have modified it slightly, because of some limitations which become important to make this solution interoperable with amsmath evnironments such as align and gather.)

Note. This environment requires the last row to end with an & or a \\, or else it will generate an error.

Simple example

The pre-amble is described below.

\begin{document}
\begin{equation}
\begin{arithmetic}
           1011 &   first factor    \\
    \times 1110 &   second factor   \\
           0000 & this row is redundant\\
          1011~ &   this row has been shifted once\\
         1011~~ \\
  +     1011~~~ \\
       10011010 & result
\end{arithmetic}
\end{equation}
\end{document}

Sample of an arithmetic calculation

Another example: now with subtraction and long division!

I have added code which allows the user to describe subtraction and long division as well. This is sample code showing the syntax. Again, the pre-amble for this document is described below.

\begin{document}
\begin{equation}
\begin{aligned}[t]
\begin{arithmetic}[t]
           1011 &   first factor    \\
    \times 1110 &   second factor   \\
           0000 & (this row is redundant)\\
          1011~ \\
         1011~~ \\
  +     1011~~~ \\
       10011010 & result
\end{arithmetic}
\quad
\begin{arithmetic}[t]
     3094 \\
  -  5029 \\
  {{-}}1935 \\
\end{arithmetic}
\quad\;\;
\begin{arithmetic}[t]
            1022~r1 \\
  13 \Into 13287~~~ \\
        \- 13~~~~~~ \\
            028~~~~ \\
         \-  26~~~~ \\
              27~~~ \\
           \- 26~~~ \\
               1~~~ \\
\end{arithmetic}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}
\end{document}

More complicated sample calculations

Note the {{-}} in the sample code above, which is necessary to avoid seeing the negation symbol as another subtraction operation; and the \- symbols, which we use as an alternative symbol for subtraction in the midst of a long division to obtain a subtraction which behaves differently (ending the underline at the first space).

Preamble

This solution is based on making entries of a table automatically use underlines, whenever it detects an arithmetic operation is to be performed. It relies on ignoring leading whitespace in each table cell, and doing fancy things with the table-cell styles via the array package.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{array}

\makeatletter
    \providecommand\text\mbox
    \newenvironment{arithmetic}[1][]{\begin{tabular}[#1]{Al}}{\end{tabular}}
    \newcolumntype{A}{>{\bgroup\def~{\phantom{0}}$\@testOptor}r<{\@gobble\\$\egroup}}

The A column style is for arithmetic operations. It changes the meaning of ~ to make it act as a space character of the correct width, turns on math mode, and tries to detect an arithmetic operator from a hard-coded list. The column style ends with some odd commands involving end-rows for technical reasons.

\def\@testOptor\ignorespaces#1#2\\{%
    \ifx#1\times
        \@OperatorRow{#1}{#2}\@tempa%
    \else\ifx#1+
        \@OperatorRow+{#2}\@tempa%
    \else\ifx#1\discretionary% detects the soft hyphen, \-
        \@ShortSubtractRow{#2}\@tempa%
    \else\ifx#1-
        \@OperatorRow-{#2}\@tempa%
    \else
        \@NormalRow{#1#2}\@tempa%
    \fi\fi\fi\fi
    \@tempa}

The \@testOptor macro grabs everything between \ignorespaces in the column definition and \\ (which may be an end-of-row or merely part of an end-of-column). If it finds an arithmetic operation, it typesets it with underlines. Otherwise, it tries to typeset it normally.

There is one special case: the soft hyphen \- is used to bring up a subtraction-like syntax, where the underlines extend only as far as the first ~ space command.

\def\@OperatorRow#1#2#3{%
    \@IfEndRow#2\@gobble\\{%
        \def#3{\underline{{}#1 #2}\\}%
    }{%
        \def#3{\underline{{}#1 #2{}}}%
    }}

\def\@NormalRow#1#2{%
    \@IfEndRow#1\@gobble\\{%
        \def#2{#1\\}%
    }{%
        \def#2{#1{}}%
    }}

\def\@IfEndRow#1\@gobble#2\\#3#4{%
    \ifx#2\@gobble
        #4%
    \else
        #3%
    \fi}

\makeatother

We have to do some weird stuff because we don't know in any given cell whether we've only ended the cell, or ended the row. We test whether or not the final macro of the argument is \@gobble: if so, it's merely an end-of-row, and so we ought to add another \@gobble to make sure that the row doesn't actually end.

\def\@ShortSubtractRow#1#2{\@@ShortSubtractRow#1~\end{#2}}
\def\@@ShortSubtractRow#1#2~#3\end#4{%
    \@IfEndRow#3\@gobble\\{%
        \def#4{\underline{\text{--} #2}#3\\}%
    }{%
        \def#4{\underline{\text{--} #2{}}#3}%
    }}

For the short subtractions used in long division, we do similar testing for ends of rows, but also define the end of the argument to be underlined by the first ~ character. We use \text{--} in place of a proper minus sign to save space (it's not as long a stroke).

\def\Into#1\\{%
    \@IfEndRow#1\@gobble\\{%
        \def\@tempa{~\raisebox{0.17ex}{\parbox{0.15em}{\centering$\big|$}}\overline{~\big.#1}\\}%
    }{%
        \def\@tempa{~\raisebox{0.17ex}{\parbox{0.15em}{\centering$\big|$}}\overline{~\big.#1{}}}%
    }\@tempa}

The \Into command isn't an operator which the environment detects, but it similarly attempts to collect the remainder of the contents of the row, in order to draw an \overline over it.

Supplement this pre-amble with the one of the above sample documents, and voilà!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like this kind of semiautomated solution. –  Manuel Apr 6 at 15:55
    
It is easy to understand and easy to use. Thank you! –  Lingfeng Xiong Apr 6 at 18:14
\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
\begin{equation}
\begin{array}{r}
                         1011\\
\underline{\mbox{}\times 1110}\\
                         0000\\
                        1011\phantom{0}\\
                       1011\phantom{00}\\
  \underline{\mbox{}+ 1011\phantom{000}}\\
                     10011010
\end{array}
\end{equation}
\end{document}

binarymultiply

share|improve this answer
    
But do 0 and 1 have always the same width? –  strpeter Apr 17 at 8:14
    
Perhaps not always, but usually proportional fonts have numerals of same width, to ensure a good vertical alignment. –  Robert Fuster Apr 17 at 10:43

If you don't need the annotations, I propose this solution:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{xparse}

\ExplSyntaxOn
\NewDocumentCommand{\multiplication}{ O{c} m m m o }
 {
  \IfNoValueTF { #5 }
   {
    \xiong_simple_table:nnnn { #1 } { #2 } { #3 } { #4 }
   }
   {
    \xiong_full_table:nnnnn { #1 } { #2 } { #3 } { #4 } { #5 }
   }
 }
\tl_new:N \l_xiong_table_body_tl

\cs_new_protected:Npn \xiong_simple_table:nnnn #1 #2 #3 #4
 {
  \begin{array}[#1]{r}
  #2 \\
  {\times}\; #3 \\
  \hline
  #4
  \end{array}
 }

\cs_new_protected:Npn \xiong_full_table:nnnnn #1 #2 #3 #4 #5
 {
  \tl_clear:N \l_xiong_table_body_tl
  \int_step_inline:nnnn { 0 } { 1 } { \clist_count:n { #5 } - 1 }
   {
    \tl_put_right:Nx \l_xiong_table_body_tl
     {
      \int_compare:nT { ##1 == \clist_count:n { #5 } - 1 }
       { {+}\exp_not:N \; }
      \clist_item:nn { #5 } { ##1 + 1 }
      \exp_not:n { \prg_replicate:nn { ##1 } { \hphantom{0} } \\ }
     }
   }
  \begin{array}[#1]{r}
  #2 \\
  {\times}\; #3 \\
  \hline
  \tl_use:N \l_xiong_table_body_tl
  \hline
  #4
  \end{array}
 }
\ExplSyntaxOff

\begin{document}
Short table: $\multiplication[t]{1011}{1110}{10011010}$

\bigskip

Long table: $\multiplication[t]{1011}{1110}{10011010}[0000,1011,1011,1011]$

\end{document}

The first optional argument is just the same as for the array environment: [t] or [b] for vertical alignment (default is center alignment). The three mandatory arguments are the factors and the result, the trailing optional argument contains the list of intermediate summands.

enter image description here

Here's an implementation for the automatic computation given the factors; limitations: multiplying by 0 is not allowed (it could be taken care of) and the product can have at most 31 digits.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{xparse}

\ExplSyntaxOn
\NewDocumentCommand{\fullmultiplication}{ O{c} m m }
 {
  \xiong_full_table:nnn { #1 } { #2 } { #3 }
 }

\tl_new:N \l__xiong_table_body_tl
\tl_new:N \l__xiong_padding_tl
\seq_new:N \l__xiong_multiplier_seq
\int_new:N \l__xiong_length_int

\cs_new_protected:Npn \xiong_full_table:nnn #1 #2 #3
 {
  \__xiong_compute:nn { #2 } { #3 }
  \begin{array}[#1]{r}
  #2 \\
  {\times}\; #3 \\
  \hline
  \tl_use:N \l__xiong_table_body_tl
  \hline
  \int_to_binary:n { \int_from_binary:n { #2 } * \int_from_binary:n { #3 } }
  \end{array}
 }

\cs_new_protected:Npn \__xiong_compute:nn #1 #2
 {
  % clear the variables
  \tl_clear:N \l__xiong_table_body_tl
  \tl_clear:N \l__xiong_padding_tl
  % split the multiplier into digits
  \seq_set_split:Nnn \l__xiong_multiplier_seq { } { #2 }
  % reverse the sequence, as we want to multiply from the right
  \seq_reverse:N \l__xiong_multiplier_seq
  % count the number of digits
  \int_set:Nn \l__xiong_length_int { \seq_count:N \l__xiong_multiplier_seq }
  % detach the most significant bit (we want to add a +)
  \seq_pop_right:NN \l__xiong_multiplier_seq \l__xiong_msb_tl
  % compute the partial summands (either zeroes or #1)
  \seq_map_inline:Nn \l__xiong_multiplier_seq
   {
    \tl_put_right:Nx \l__xiong_table_body_tl 
     {
      \str_if_eq:nnTF { 1 } { ##1 }
       { #1 }
       { \prg_replicate:nn { \l__xiong_length_int } { 0 } }
     }
    \tl_put_right:NV \l__xiong_table_body_tl \l__xiong_padding_tl
    \tl_put_right:Nn \l__xiong_table_body_tl { \\ }
    \tl_put_right:Nn \l__xiong_padding_tl { \hphantom{0} }
   }
  % the last summand is #1
  \tl_put_right:Nn \l__xiong_table_body_tl { {+}\; #1 \tl_use:N \l__xiong_padding_tl \\ }
 }
\ExplSyntaxOff

\begin{document}
Here it is: $\fullmultiplication[t]{1011}{1110}$

\end{document}

enter image description here

With some options more, through a key-value syntax:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{xparse}

\ExplSyntaxOn
\NewDocumentCommand{\fullmultiplication}{ O{} m m }
 {
  \group_begin:
  \keys_set:nn { xiong/binmult } { #1 }
  \xiong_multiplication:nn { #2 } { #3 }
  \group_end:
 }

\keys_define:nn { xiong/binmult }
 {
  align .choice:,
  align/top    .code:n = \tl_set:Nn \l__xiong_align_tl { t },
  align/t      .code:n = \tl_set:Nn \l__xiong_align_tl { t },
  align/bottom .code:n = \tl_set:Nn \l__xiong_align_tl { b },
  align/b      .code:n = \tl_set:Nn \l__xiong_align_tl { b },
  align/c      .code:n = \tl_set:Nn \l__xiong_align_tl { c },
  align/center .code:n = \tl_set:Nn \l__xiong_align_tl { c },
  full         .bool_set:N = \l__xiong_full_bool,
  full         .initial:n  = true,
  showzero     .bool_set:N = \l__xiong_showzero_bool,
  showzero     .initial:n  = true,
 }

\tl_new:N \l__xiong_align_tl
\tl_set:Nn \l__xiong_align_tl { c } % default
\tl_new:N \l__xiong_table_body_tl
\tl_new:N \l__xiong_padding_tl
\seq_new:N \l__xiong_multiplier_seq
\int_new:N \l__xiong_length_int

\cs_new_protected:Npn \xiong_multiplication:nn #1 #2
 {
  \int_compare:nT { #2 == 0 } { \bool_set_false:N \l__xiong_full_bool }
  \bool_if:NT \l__xiong_full_bool
   { \__xiong_compute:nn { #1 } { #2 } }
  \begin{array}[\l__xiong_align_tl]{r}
  #1 \\
  {\times}\; #2 \\
  \hline
  \bool_if:NT \l__xiong_full_bool
  {
   \tl_use:N \l__xiong_table_body_tl
   \hline
  }
  \int_to_binary:n { \int_from_binary:n { #1 } * \int_from_binary:n { #2 } }
  \end{array}
 }

\cs_new_protected:Npn \__xiong_compute:nn #1 #2
 {
  % clear the variables
  \tl_clear:N \l__xiong_table_body_tl
  \tl_clear:N \l__xiong_padding_tl
  % split the multiplier into digits
  \seq_set_split:Nnn \l__xiong_multiplier_seq { } { #2 }
  % reverse the sequence, as we want to multiply from the right
  \seq_reverse:N \l__xiong_multiplier_seq
  % count the number of digits
  \int_set:Nn \l__xiong_length_int { \seq_count:N \l__xiong_multiplier_seq }
  % detach the most significant bit (we want to add a +)
  \seq_pop_right:NN \l__xiong_multiplier_seq \l__xiong_msb_tl
  % compute the partial summands (either zeroes or #1)
  \seq_map_inline:Nn \l__xiong_multiplier_seq
   {
    \tl_put_right:Nx \l__xiong_table_body_tl 
     {
      \str_if_eq:nnTF { 1 } { ##1 }
       { #1 }
       {
        \bool_if:NT \l__xiong_showzero_bool
         { \prg_replicate:nn { \l__xiong_length_int } { 0 } }
       }
     }
    \tl_put_right:NV \l__xiong_table_body_tl \l__xiong_padding_tl
    \bool_if:nT { \l__xiong_showzero_bool || \str_if_eq_p:nn { 1 } { ##1 } }
     { \tl_put_right:Nn \l__xiong_table_body_tl { \\ } }
    \tl_put_right:Nn \l__xiong_padding_tl { \hphantom{0} }
   }
  % the last summand is #1
  \tl_put_right:Nn \l__xiong_table_body_tl { {+}\; #1 \tl_use:N \l__xiong_padding_tl \\ }
 }
\ExplSyntaxOff

\begin{document}
Here it is: $\fullmultiplication[align=t]{1011}{1110}$

Here it is: $\fullmultiplication[align=b,showzero=false]{1011}{1110}$

Here it is: $\fullmultiplication[align=b,full=false]{1011}{1110}$

Here it is: $\fullmultiplication{1011}{0}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
your last sentence sounds like a challenge :-): \newcommand{\binmul}[2]{\xintDecToBin{\xintiiMul{\xintBinToDec{#1}}{\xintBinToD‌​ec{#2}}}} with \usepackage{xintbinhex}. –  jfbu Apr 6 at 11:18
    
@jfbu I was meaning computing also the intermediate summands. Otherwise it's \int_to_binary:n { \int_from_binary:n { 1011 } * \int_from_binary:n { 1110 } } –  egreg Apr 6 at 12:10
    
ah, ok, didn't know about these l3exp macros. Does it allow arbitrary length material? and about the "intermediate summands", do you mean adding one at a time? or perhaps columnwise? –  jfbu Apr 6 at 12:50
    
@jfbu It allows numbers in the TeX admissible range, that is less than 2^31. For “intermediate summands” I mean 0000 and 1011 (three times) to be computed and typeset as part of the macro work. It's not really difficult: just split the multiplier into digits and do the partial multiplications; computing the sum is not needed, as we already know the final result. –  egreg Apr 6 at 12:53

I am now proposing a variant which also computes and displays partial sums. The rationale is that it is very much prone to errors to try to compute by hands the necessary carries when the multiplicand has more than a dozen digits. In base 2, typically the carry will influence more than one columns on remaining to be summed.

Besides, this variant also discards the zero rows. There is a slight defect that the partial sum is a single zero (not a string of them) at the beginning until the first non zero digit of the multiplicand is found.

binary multiplication with partial sums

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{xintbinhex}
\usepackage{color}
\newbox\tempbox
\newcounter{rowcnt}

\makeatletter
\newcommand\BinaryMult [2]{%
% convert the first operand to a chain of zeros, for later use
% (the operands are assumed non-negative)
  \oodef\@@BM@Zeros {\xintApplyUnbraced{\expandafter0\@gobble}{#1}}%
% convert the first and second operands to decimal
  \oodef\@@BM@FirstAsDecimal  {\xintBinToDec{#1}}%
  \oodef\@@BM@SecondAsDecimal {\xintBinToDec{#2}}%
% compute the result of the multiplication in decimal
  \oodef\MultResultDec {\xintiiMul\@@BM@FirstAsDecimal\@@BM@SecondAsDecimal }%
% and convert to binary
  \oodef\MultResultBin {\xintDecToBin \MultResultDec }%
% we will need some macro to hold 0's for phantom
% but we also use a counter, for the sake of the annotations
  \def\@@BM@phantoms {}\setcounter{rowcnt}{0}%
% this variant generates also the partial sums
  \def\@@BM@PartialSum {0}%
  \let\@@BM@ShiftedFirst \@@BM@FirstAsDecimal
% to allow page-breaks, one could use a longtable here
 \begin{tabular}{r@{\quad}l}
%
% first line
    $#1$& (this is \@@BM@FirstAsDecimal\ in decimal)\\
% second line with rule
    \setbox\tempbox \hbox{${}\times #2$}\copy\tempbox
      \makebox[0pt][r]{\rule[-1\jot]{\wd\tempbox }{1pt}}
    & (this is \@@BM@SecondAsDecimal\ in decimal)\\
% now the rows with the summands
    \xintFor* ##1 in {\xintReverseOrder{#2}}\do
    {\if##10\expandafter\@firstoftwo\else\expandafter\@secondoftwo\fi
     {\stepcounter{rowcnt}%
     \global\oodef\@@BM@ShiftedFirst{\xintDouble\@@BM@ShiftedFirst}%
     \global\odef\@@BM@phantoms{\@@BM@phantoms 0}}%
     {\global\let\@@BM@ifLastRow\xintifForLast
     \xintifForFirst
        {}{\color{blue}$\xintDecToBin\@@BM@PartialSum$\\}%
     $\@@BM@ifLastRow{{}+}{}% insert a plus sign only for the last row
     \if##10\@@BM@Zeros\else #1%
     \global
     \oodef\@@BM@PartialSum{\xintiiAdd\@@BM@PartialSum\@@BM@ShiftedFirst}%
     \fi
      \phantom{\@@BM@phantoms}$%
     \global
     \oodef\@@BM@ShiftedFirst{\xintDouble\@@BM@ShiftedFirst}%
     \global\odef\@@BM@phantoms{\@@BM@phantoms 0}%
        &
    (this is $#1 \times ##1$\ifnum\value{rowcnt}>0 , shifted \arabic{rowcnt}
     position\ifnum\value{rowcnt}>1s\fi\ to the left\fi)%
     \stepcounter{rowcnt}% 
     \expandafter\\}}%
   \setbox\tempbox \hbox{$\MultResultBin$}\copy\tempbox
   \makebox[0pt][r]{\rule[2ex]{\dimexpr\wd\tempbox+1ex\relax}{1pt}}& 
     (this is $\MultResultDec$ in decimal)
  \end{tabular}%
}
\makeatother

% After \BinaryMult, the result of the computation is available in  
%   \MultResultDec:  decimal
%   \MultResultBin:  binary

\begin{document}
\noindent\BinaryMult {101110001100}{11001010110011}
\end{document}


The update is only to make the code a bit more efficient, spare a counter, avoid doing twice the same computation, etc, the output is identical; a sensible variant would choose not to print the rows of zeros. (see more recent update above)

This answer computes the entire multiplication automatically. As it uses a tabular the whole thing must fit on one page, which is a pity because it can compute much longer things. It would be possible to devise a routine allowing page-breaks, but somehow I got started on the tabular idea. (and anyhow one could use the code almost as is with a longtable in place of a tabular)

binary multiplication

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{xintbinhex}

\newbox\tempbox
\newcounter{rowcnt}

\makeatletter
\newcommand\BinaryMult [2]{%
% convert the first operand to a chain of zeros, for later use
% (the operands are assumed non-negative)
  \oodef\@@BM@Zeros {\xintApplyUnbraced{\expandafter0\@gobble}{#1}}%
% convert the first and second operands to decimal
  \oodef\@@BM@FirstAsDecimal  {\xintBinToDec{#1}}%
  \oodef\@@BM@SecondAsDecimal {\xintBinToDec{#2}}%
% compute the result of the multiplication in decimal
  \oodef\MultResultDec {\xintiiMul\@@BM@FirstAsDecimal\@@BM@SecondAsDecimal }%
% and convert to binary
  \oodef\MultResultBin {\xintDecToBin \MultResultDec }%
% we will need some macro to hold 0's for phantom
% but we also use a counter, for the sake of the annotations
  \def\@@BM@phantoms {}\setcounter{rowcnt}{0}%
%
% to allow page-breaks, one could use a longtable here
 \begin{tabular}{r@{\quad}l}
%
% first line
    $#1$& (this is \@@BM@FirstAsDecimal\ in decimal)\\
% second line with rule
    \setbox\tempbox \hbox{${}\times #2$}\copy\tempbox
      \makebox[0pt][r]{\rule[-1\jot]{\wd\tempbox }{1pt}}
    & (this is \@@BM@SecondAsDecimal\ in decimal)\\
% now the rows with the summands
    \xintFor* ##1 in {\xintReverseOrder{#2}}\do
    {%% we typeset in math mode. 
     $%
      \xintifForLast{{}+}{}% insert a plus sign only for the last summand
      \if##10\@@BM@Zeros\else #1\fi
      \hphantom{\@@BM@phantoms}%
     $%
      \global\odef\@@BM@phantoms{\@@BM@phantoms 0}% for next row
        &
    (this is $#1 \times ##1$\ifnum\value{rowcnt}>0 , shifted \arabic{rowcnt}
     position\ifnum\value{rowcnt}>1s\fi\ to the left\fi)%
     \stepcounter{rowcnt}% 
     \\}%
   \setbox\tempbox \hbox{$\MultResultBin$}\copy\tempbox
   \makebox[0pt][r]{\rule[2ex]{\dimexpr\wd\tempbox+1ex\relax}{1pt}}& 
     (this is $\MultResultDec$ in decimal)
  \end{tabular}%
}
\makeatother

% After \BinaryMult, the result of the computation is available in  
%   \MultResultDec:  decimal
%   \MultResultBin:  binary

\begin{document}
\noindent\BinaryMult {1011}{1110}

\bigskip

\noindent\BinaryMult {101110001100}{11001010110011}
\end{document}
share|improve this answer

Here is some code that will do what you want:

$
\begin{array}{cccccccccl}
&&&&1&0&1&1&\quad&\text{(this is 11 in decimal)} \\
&&&\times&1&1&1&0&&\text{(this is 14 in decimal)} \\ \cline{4-8}
&&&&0&0&0&0&&\text{(this is $1011 \times 0)$} \\
&&&1&0&1&1&&&\text{(this is $1011 \times 1$, shifted one position to the left)} \\
&&1&0&1&1&&&&\text{(this is $1011 \times 1$, shifted two positions to the left)} \\
&1&0&1&1&&&&&\text{(this is $1011 \times 1$, shifted three positions to the left)} \\ \cline{1-8}
1&0&0&1&1&0&1&0&&\text{(this is $154$ in decimal)} \\
\end{array}
$

To get the code I used a spreadsheet program. I typed the numbers and text into cells as you would like to see them in the output. Some TeX commands were included, you see them in the code. I then copied the spreadsheet cells and pasted them into a TeX editor. Between two numbers there was space in the TeX editor, but this is a special non-printing character. Selecting this special character and using a replace all command, I inserted all the &'s with little effort.

Your editor will need these features if you want to use this method. I tried this with two different spreadsheet programs and four different editors. For all 4 editors, this method worked with little trouble. Using a spreadsheet program can be a useful way to prepare several things like tabular, matrix and array to use in a TeX document.

share|improve this answer
    
You may want to add the instruction $\setlength\arraycolsep{0pt} to avoid excessive whitespace in the columns of the array environment. In addition, I'd load the mathtools pacakge and write \mathclap{\times} instead of just \times at that start of the second row; doing so avoids some undesirable spacing issues that arise because \times, by itself, is wider than the numerals 0 and 1. –  Mico Apr 6 at 8:48

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