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I need to include some licensing information on the back cover of a free CC-licensed book. Instead of frankly mentioning the license ("This work is licensed under CC-by-nc-sa, Google knows more"), I'd like to have complete information about the rights it gives, i.e. comparable to what the license description says on their site, both images and text. I imagined the following to be in the code for that:

\usepackage{creativecommons}
...
\license[2.5]{by-nc-sa}
...
% images only
\shortlicense[3.0]{by-nc-sa}

Does anyone know of a package that makes such licensing notices easier?

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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

For typesetting the Creative Commons licence logos you could use the cclicenses package.

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I wonder how I missed that one... :-/ Thanks for the hint, too bad it's a bit outdated... –  Nikolai Prokoschenko Aug 15 '10 at 0:09
    
Most of the icons by this package look good enough, with the exception of the \ccnc (non-commercial) icon. Apparently that thing is rendered by putting a rotated backslash over an encircled '$'. When using only the default Computer Modern font however, that backslash is too short to cover the entire circle. –  Giel Aug 15 '10 at 11:14
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@Giel @rassie the ccicons package looks a lot better than these icons do. See my answer. –  Seamus Jan 11 '11 at 22:59
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The ccicons package contains much prettier icons than those provided by cclisences

I don't think there is a package that defines macros for inserting CC license text into TeX documents, but it would be easy enough to make one.

See also this post on the creative commons website.

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Just curious (and lazy): are these as good as grabbing the PDF from the creative commons website, as suggested by Lennart? –  Will Robertson Jan 12 '11 at 1:01
    
They look pretty darn close to the real deal. I expect they are just the SVGs turned into a font... –  Seamus Jan 12 '11 at 11:26
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Personally I thought that looked pretty bad. I solved it by downloading the relevant button from http://creativecommons.org/about/downloads as svg, converting it to pdf with Inkscape and including it as an image.

I did have to rename it, it seems that the two dots in the file name, by-nc-sa.eu.pdf confuses something, so you get an error, but by renaming it to by-nc-sa.pdf it worked fine.

Importing the eps file also worked, except that I got cutmarks around the button!

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