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I want to rotate the word flower 5 times and the rotations should lap over the c. That's what I got so far:

\clap{\rotatebox[origin=c]{0}{flower}}\clap{\rotatebox[origin=c]{20}
    {flower}}\clap{\rotatebox[origin=c]{45}{flower}}
    \clap{\rotatebox[origin=c]{60}{flower}}\clap{\rotatebox[origin=c]{80}{flower}}

Could somebody please help me?

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1 Answer 1

Like this?

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\begin{document}
  \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{0}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{22.5}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{45}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{67.5}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][c]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{90}{flower}}
\end{document}

enter image description here

Here there are two things. \makebox[<alignment>] will take <alignment> as l or c or r as values. And \rotatebox, according to the manual of graphicx:

enter image description here

Hence you can play with all of these options.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\begin{document}
  \makebox[0pt][l]{\rotatebox{0}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][l]{\rotatebox{22.5}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][l]{\rotatebox{45}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][l]{\rotatebox{67.5}{flower}}%
  \makebox[0pt][l]{\rotatebox{90}{flower}}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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Yes, that works! Thank you! :) –  Marie Jul 2 at 8:50
    
And what, if I want to rotate the word at the first letter and it should lap there? Do I replace the c with l? –  Marie Jul 2 at 8:52
    
That's perfect, thank you! :) –  Marie Jul 2 at 9:07
2  
I've taken the liberty of (a) reformatting your input code to make it easier to parse visually and (b) adding % symbols to suppress unwanted insertions of whitespace. –  Mico Jul 2 at 9:15
1  
@Mico -- looks much better. however, it just occurred to me that showing the "with space" version and the fixed one side by side would be instructive. (not suggesting a change though. but there may be some venue where such a demonstration would be useful and appropriate. maybe a question here about "what problems might arise because a & is omitted?" this "fan" would be a really good illustration. –  barbara beeton Jul 2 at 18:46

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