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I know that the title of this question might be a little bit confusing, but I don't know how can I solve my problem and even how to search for the solution. I want to make inside a long text something what looks like:

Title
  Some text
Title2
  Some text 

But I don't want to break the whole text using section or subsection comment. And I am looking for a solution more elegant that normal tab before 'Some text'. Even the enumerate or itemize environment is not what I am looking for. I just want to make Title as a bold text and in the next line have some text.

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What about Title \par \hspace*{2em} Some text \par Title2 \par \hspace*{2em} Some more text...? –  Werner Jul 2 at 16:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This, or some variant, may solve your problem. It's not clear what you want when the text wraps to a new line.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\setlength{\parindent}{0cm}

\newcommand{\mytitle}[1]{%
\addvspace{0.2cm}% perhaps, as Barbara Beeton suggests
\textbf{#1}
\par
\hspace{0.5cm}
}
\begin{document}

\mytitle{Title}
\lipsum[15]

\mytitle{Another title}
More text

\end{document}

enter image description here

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This is exactly what I was looking for! Thank you so much :) –  Ziva Jul 2 at 16:26
1  
when the text in an "early" paragraph occupies more than one line, there really isn't a great deal of contrast to make the next title stand out. this would be even less obvious if the last line of the paragraph is full or nearly so. some \addvpace before the title could help. –  barbara beeton Jul 2 at 17:31
\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

If only parindent is positive:

\def\zhiva#1{\noindent\textbf{#1}\par}

\zhiva{Title1} My paragraph.

\zhiva{Title1} My paragraph.

\end{document}

enter image description here

I can see, that in a dual answer there is an opposite vision of indenting and non-indenting.

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