Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I cannot tell if the following is a bug in the LinuxLibertine OTF files or if it is a bug in XeLaTeX (or both?). The problem is: when I try to typeset cyrillic text in italic and bold, the glyphs appearantly cannot be found in LinuxLibertine.

I have tried this with * my uptodate Arch Linux running TeXLive 2013, using the libertine package from my distribution, * the same TeXLive with freshly downloaded OTF files from the LinuxLibertine project, * a vanilla TeXLive 2014 as installed from tug.org together with the original Libertine OTF files.

Here is a minimal working example (expecting the OTF files in the current working directory; they can be downloaded from https://sourceforge.net/projects/linuxlibertine/files/linuxlibertine/5.3.0/):

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\begin{document}
\setmainfont[Path              = /path/to/linuxlibertine/,
             Extension         = .otf,
             BoldFont          = LinLibertine_RB,
             ItalicFont        = LinLibertine_RI,
             BoldItalicFont    = LinLibertine_RBI
            ]{LinLibertine_R}
\raggedright
Regular: положим\\
Bold: \textbf{положим}\\
Italic: \textit{положим}\\
Bold+Italic: \textit{\textbf{положим}}
\end{document}

The OTF files come straight out of LinLibertineOTF_5.3.0_2012_07_02.tgz. This is XeTeX 3.1415926-2.5-0.9999.3-2014042815 (TeX Live 2013/Arch Linux). In the last line (Bold+Italic), for each cyrillic glyph I see something like a crossed out rectangle in the resulting PDF file. (When I use LuaLatex I see nothing where the Bold+Italic glyphs should appear.)

As I said, I cannot tell if this is a bug in LinuxLibertine or in XeTeX. I would be happy about any pointers/workarounds, as I wish to have this fixed soon.

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to TeX.SX! Usually, we don't put a greeting or a “thank you” in our posts. While this might seem strange at first, it is not a sign of lack of politeness, but rather part of our trying to keep everything very concise. Accepting and upvoting answers is the preferred way here to say “thank you” to users who helped you. –  Adam Liter Jul 2 at 22:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Apparently Linux Libertine lacks the Cyrillic alphabet in the bold italic font, but it has it in the semibold italic font. So a workaround is to use semibold instead of bold:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\begin{document}
\setmainfont[
  Path              = /usr/local/texlive/2014/texmf-dist/fonts/opentype/public/libertine/,
  Extension         = .otf,
  BoldFont          = LinLibertine_RZ,
  ItalicFont        = LinLibertine_RI,
  BoldItalicFont    = LinLibertine_RZI,
]{LinLibertine_R}
\raggedright
Regular: положим\\
Bold: \textbf{положим}\\
Italic: \textit{положим}\\
Bold+Italic: \textit{\textbf{положим}}
\end{document}

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.