Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How much space is a line, vertically ? E.g. something like "1.5em" ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This would typically be measured from the baseline of one line to the baseline of another, or given by \baselineskip, and depends on the font size loaded/specified as well as the font size current active. For example, with the following \baselineskips are associated with the respective default font sizes loaded with the class:

  • 10pt default font implies a 12pt \baselineskip (see size10.clo);

  • 11pt default font implies a 13.6pt \baselineskip (see size11.clo);

  • 12pt default font implies a 14.5pt \baselineskip (see size12.clo)

However, under a 11pt default font, \LARGE sets a font at size 17.28pt with a \baselineskip of 22pt. Conversion between lengths from points is discussed in Conversion pt to mm or cm.

You can adjust this line spacing (or \baselineskip) by making a font selection

share|improve this answer
\documentclass[a5paper]{article}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\def\someText{And now follows some text to
show the distance of lines. The value is saved in \texttt{\textbackslash baselineskip}.}
\begin{document}
\the\baselineskip%%% The current distance between two baselines 
\vbox to 0pt {\hbox to 0pt {\textcolor{red}{\rule[0pt]{1cm}{\baselineskip}}}} \someText

\small\the\baselineskip
\vbox to 0pt {\hbox to 0pt {\textcolor{red}{\rule[0pt]{1cm}{\baselineskip}}}}  \someText

\tiny\the\baselineskip
\vbox to 0pt {\hbox to 0pt {\textcolor{red}{\rule[0pt]{1cm}{\baselineskip}}}}  \someText

\huge\the\baselineskip
\vbox to 0pt {\hbox to 0pt {\textcolor{red}{\rule[0pt]{1cm}{\baselineskip}}}}  \someText
\end{document}

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.