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I'm writing a thesis and decided to use Charter (\usepackage{XCharter}) for text and Palatino (\usepackage{mathpazo}) for math. Unfortunately the commas in Charter and Palatino look very different, so I run into troubles when writing lists of variables in the text. Here's a minimal example:

The polynomial ring $\C[x,y,z]$ has variables $x$, $y$, $z$.

This renders as:

rendered example

Is this difference in fonts acceptable or should I consider using a different combinations of fonts?

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2  
You're using two incompatible fonts for text and math. Having different characters is to be expected. –  egreg Aug 8 at 21:16
    
@egreg So is this a no go? Should I rather use only Charter or only Palatino for both, text and math? –  Christoph Aug 8 at 21:18
1  
Well, your problem is not exactly about LaTeX it is a design problem, more correctly a bad typographical combination. In design it is suggested to use only one typeface, maximum two. It's not necessary that the chosen typefaces live together happily forever, but, as a rule, should not collide. And in this case they do. –  Aradnix Aug 8 at 21:21
    
Why did you choose these typefaces, it is for a protocol or manual of style or was a personal decision for aesthetic taste? –  Aradnix Aug 8 at 21:23
    
It was a personal decision. I've previously used Palatino a lot but felt that the text looks more appealing in Charter. However, the formulas set with Charter look quite clunky in my eyes. –  Christoph Aug 8 at 21:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The design of Palatino is not really compatible with Charter. There is a free version of a math font compatible with Charter, available with mathdesign.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[charter]{mathdesign}
\usepackage{XCharter}

\newcommand{\numberset}[1]{\mathbb{#1}}
\newcommand{\C}{\numberset{C}}

\begin{document}
The polynomial ring $\C[x,y,z]$ has variables $x$, $y$, $z$.

\itshape
The polynomial ring $\C[x,y,z]$ has variables $x$, $y$, $z$.
\end{document}

enter image description here

If you prefer the mathpazo blackboard bold, add a couple of lines:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[charter]{mathdesign}
\usepackage{XCharter}

\DeclareMathAlphabet\PazoBB{U}{fplmbb}{m}{n}
\renewcommand{\mathbb}{\PazoBB}

\newcommand{\numberset}[1]{\mathbb{#1}}
\newcommand{\C}{\numberset{C}}

\begin{document}
The polynomial ring $\C[x,y,z]$ has variables $x$, $y$, $z$.

\itshape
The polynomial ring $\C[x,y,z]$ has variables $x$, $y$, $z$.
\end{document}

enter image description here

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