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I have now written my first e-book in LaTeX but, before I publish it, I wish to hire someone with superior LaTeX skills to fix the design and formatting of the book. At the moment I have tons of issues with the e-book and it doesn't look too great. Where could I find people for hourly hire with good book design skills and good LaTeX skills who could help me? It's easy to find people with good book design skills, but all of them work in Illustrator or CorelDRAW and not LaTeX.

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2 Answers 2

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TUG have pages for both 'consultants for hire' and 'jobs advertised. You could consider using these to find the appropriate person.

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Thanks, I emailed some people from the consultants for hire list. –  Peteris Krumins May 31 '11 at 21:38

If it's hard to find a LaTeX capable designer: you could hire a good book designer to develop a great look, a skilled LaTeX user can help to implement that.

Anyway, you can ask LaTeX users in web forums, Usenet groups and Q&A site listed here: Good resources on-line for information about TeX, LaTeX and friends

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Yes, especially comp.text.tex. –  Martin Scharrer May 31 '11 at 21:06
Does this mean, that most books are not designed in LaTeX? In that case writing books in LaTeX is complete waste of time, because in the end designers retype the whole thing from the scratch. I am asking this because I have recently wrote one and after designer started working, the design improved considerably, while equation typography completely demised. –  Pygmalion Sep 25 '13 at 11:15
@Pygmalion It depends. Science books are often published using LaTeX. Ask the publisher before. It's just that LaTeX doesn't do the whole design - it means structure and fine typography, and there are templates. I mean, you can consider book design and LaTeX workflow as separate things. The book designer can develop a layout, kind of sectioning and choose fonts, while the LaTeX user can implement and follow a style with LaTeX to match the design. A game designer is not the programmer. –  Stefan Kottwitz Sep 25 '13 at 12:50
@StefanKottwitz The "publisher" is faculty at which I work, and the "designer" is whoever is prepared to do the job for little money provided (including myself). I have one fine (money-naive) designer, but she has no latex knowledge. As you pointed out, I came to conclusion that I hire designer to make design and then I implement her design into LaTeX myself, but... 1) I am not sure that "everything" designer wants can be done in LaTeX 2) I am good enough to do this complicate LaTeX stuff myself. –  Pygmalion Sep 25 '13 at 13:10
The ideal workflow is that: 1) the book is written in LaTeX. 2) the book is designed by a book designer, using Adobe InDesign, Quark Xpress, Adobe Illustrator, &c. 3) the compositor then creates a set of LaTeX macros / a format which will typeset the book using the provided design (ideally this is done w/ a pair of macro files, one which only defines empty commands, the second which actually implements the design --- comment out the latter when returning the design to the author). –  WillAdams Sep 8 at 12:27

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