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I am using the apacite package for citing references and do not know how to suppress the output of a hyphenated last name with the initial of a first name. For example, I enter the following entry with the appropriate fields:

@phdthesis{lillomartin:1986,
    Author = {Lillo-Martin, Diane},
    School = {University of California, San Diego},
    Title = {Parameter setting: Evidence from use, acquisition, and 
             breakdown in American Sign Language},
    Year = {1986}
    }

When I cite the said author, e.g. \cite{lillomartin:1986}, the output shows up like this:

(D. Lillo-Martin, 1986)

How do I change the entry so the citation shows up without the first name initial, e.g.:

(Lillo-Martin, 1986)

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Please, make a minimal working example, as I don't get the reference with the initial. Welcome to TeX.SX! –  egreg May 31 '11 at 21:37
3  
The reason you get the initial is because you have two items in your bibliography by Lillo-Martin which APA-cite thinks are by different authors, and it's using the initial to distinguish them. Check your bib file for works by her and make sure the author names are identical. If that's not the case, then you need to make an example, as @egreg suggests. –  Alan Munn May 31 '11 at 22:52
    
@Alan: Please turn your comment into an answer. –  lockstep Jun 12 '11 at 21:22

1 Answer 1

The reason you get the initial is because you have two items in your bibliography by Lillo-Martin which apacite thinks are by different authors, and it's using the initial to distinguish them. Check your bib file for works by her and make sure the author names are identical. If that's not the case, then you need to make an example.

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