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I have drawn a few arrows as follows:

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{decorations.pathmorphing, arrows.meta, arrows}
\begin{document}

\begin{tikzpicture}[>=Stealth]
\draw [line width = 1pt, decorate, decoration = {snake, amplitude = 1mm, segment length = 1cm, post length = 1mm},arrows={->[length=0.5cm,width=0.5cm]}] (-3,-1) -- (-3,1);
\draw [line width = 1pt, decorate, decoration = {snake, amplitude = 1mm, segment length = 1cm, post length = 1mm},arrows={->[length=0.5cm,width=0.5cm]}] (-2,-1) -- (-2,1);
\end{tikzpicture}

\end{document}

I am now wondering if it is possible to draw water droplets falling down from each side of each arrow. I know I can get an svg of a water droplet and then add that one in but I was wondering if this has already been done with tikz?

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what is your rendition of a water droplet? The cartoonish teardrop? And if so why not draw it ? –  percusse Aug 9 at 21:29
    
Yes I guess that would be it –  KatyB Aug 9 at 21:34
    
You might find the egg and the valentine heart at TeXample.net to be good starting points. You can adjust the shading colors and path shape to produce a water drop. –  Paul Gessler Aug 9 at 21:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 17 down vote accepted

There are more efficient ways of doing the shading effect (see below) and it is a bit "cartoony" but anyway:

\documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone}
\tikzset{%
  raindrop/.pic={
    code={\tikzset{scale=1/10}
 \clip [preaction={top color=blue!50!cyan!50, bottom color=blue!50!cyan}]
 (0,0)  .. controls ++(0,-1) and ++(0,1) .. (1,-2)
 arc (360:180:1)
 .. controls ++(0,1) and ++(0,-1) .. (0,0) -- cycle;
% %
 \foreach \j in {1,3,...,20}
 \shade [top color=blue!50!cyan!50, shift=(270:0), xscale=1-\j/40,yscale=1-\j/80, white, opacity=1/15]
 [rotate=-\j] (0,0)  .. controls ++(0,-1) and ++(0,1) .. (1,-2)
 arc (360:180:1)
 .. controls ++(0,1) and ++(0,-1) .. (0,0) -- cycle;
  }}}

\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}
\foreach \i in {1,...,10}
  \path (rand,-\i/8+rand/4) pic {raindrop};
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

enter image description here

And here a custom radial shading is used. The choice of colors is important (specifically how much white is mixed in at the focal point of the shading), otherwise it ends up looking like a Christmas decoration:

\documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone}

\pgfdeclareradialshading[droplet color]{droplet}{\pgfqpoint{-10bp}{-10bp}}{%
 color(0bp)=(droplet color!50!white);
 color(9bp)=(droplet color!75!white);
 color(18bp)=(droplet color!85!black);
 color(25bp)=(droplet color);
 color(50bp)=(droplet color!50!white)}

\colorlet{droplet color}{blue!50!cyan}
\tikzset{%
  raindrop/.pic={
    code={\tikzset{scale=1/10}
 \shade [shading=droplet]
 (0,0)  .. controls ++(0,-1) and ++(0,1) .. (1,-2)
 arc (360:180:1)
 .. controls ++(0,1) and ++(0,-1) .. (0,0) -- cycle;
  }}}

\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}
\foreach \i in {1,...,10}
  \path (rand,-\i/8+rand/4) pic {raindrop};
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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