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I am entering bibliography for my paper, i have cited a paper with "LNCS 2257" where "LNCS" stands for "Lecture Notes in Computer Science". I would like to know in the file `.bib", which field should this "LNCS" belong to?

Thank you very much

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

LNCS 2257 seems to refer to a volume called "practical aspects of declarative languages".

Borrowing Springer's "export citation" code from a randomly chosen article from this volume, I think it should be cited something like this:

@incollection {springerlink:10.1007/3-540-45587-6_1,
   author = {Meadows, Catherine},
   affiliation = {Naval Research Laboratory, Code 5543 20375 Washington, DC USA},
   title = {Using a Declarative Language to Build an Experimental Analysis Tool},
   booktitle = {Practical Aspects of Declarative Languages},
   series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
   editor = {Krishnamurthi, Shriram and Ramakrishnan, C.},
   publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
   isbn = {},
   pages = {1-2},
   volume = {2257},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/3-540-45587-6_1},
   note = {10.1007/3-540-45587-6_1},
   year = {2002}
}

There are obviously useless fields in these exported bibliographies, but it should give you an idea of how to go about citing these things.

To answer the question you actually asked: @incollection

To cite the collection as a whole, I'd go for @book probably...

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Thanks for your reply... but this prints "2257" instead of "LNCS 2257", i would hope a field "xxxx = {LNCS}"... –  SoftTimur Jun 7 '11 at 16:08
    
@SoftTimur There is the series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science}, field. Does that not print? You could always "cheat" and put "LNCS 2257" in the volume field. (That might break, I don't know whether volume requires a number...) –  Seamus Jun 7 '11 at 16:19
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