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I was wondering if there is any convention for styling long mathematical equation ? I have an exuation which originaly took more than a pagewidth so I splited it using

eqnarray

however I think it still doesn't look good - the equation number is overlaping (a bit) with actual equation - it looks quite ugly. Is there any better way to format this equation

 \begin{eqnarray*}
 \left( R_{j}p_{ij}^* \right)^T  \left( \frac{\partial R_{j} }{\partial \phi_{j}}p_{ij}^* \right)  
& = &   \left( p_{ij}^* \right)^T 
\left(
\begin{array}{cc}
\cos{\phi_{j}} & \sin{\phi_{j}} \\
-\sin{\phi_{j}} & \cos{\phi_{j}}
\end{array}
\right)
\left(
\begin{array}{cc}
-\sin{\phi_{j}} & -\cos{\phi_{j}} \\
\cos{\phi_{j}} & -\sin{\phi_{j}}
\end{array} \right)
p_{ij}^*
  \\ & = & \left( p_{ij}^* \right)^T
\left(
\begin{array}{cc}
0 & -1 \\
1 & 0
\end{array}\right) p_{ij}^* = 0
\end{eqnarray*}

any suggestion would be great :) EDIT It seems to be a problem with rendering equations

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's strongly recommended to use align instead of eqnarray, besides more consistent spacing this also fixes the overlapping issue (of course align* and eqnarray*, as in the question, don't use numbering). For align*, load the amsmath package and have a look at the amsmath user's guide, which shows further environments for multiline equations with different alignment.

Your code can easily be modified this way:

\usepackage{amsmath}
...    
\begin{align*}
 \left( R_{j}p_{ij}^* \right)^T  \left( \frac{\partial R_{j} }{\partial
 \phi_{j}}p_{ij}^* \right)  
&=    \left( p_{ij}^* \right)^T 
\left(
\begin{array}{cc}
\cos{\phi_{j}} & \sin{\phi_{j}} \\
-\sin{\phi_{j}} & \cos{\phi_{j}}
\end{array}
\right)
\left(
\begin{array}{cc}
-\sin{\phi_{j}} & -\cos{\phi_{j}} \\
\cos{\phi_{j}} & -\sin{\phi_{j}}
\end{array} \right)
p_{ij}^*\\
  &= \left( p_{ij}^* \right)^T
\left(
\begin{array}{cc}
0 & -1 \\
1 & 0
\end{array}\right) p_{ij}^* = 0
\end{align*}
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