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How can I make one of those flyers that you always see stapled to a telephone pole or taped to a street lamp? They are usually on letter paper and have a tear off phone number and/or URL at the bottom.

Also, the text is usually centered, but there isn't a center tag on the wiki. Finally, the text of the tear off phone number should be rotated.


                      Kittens


               Free to good home


                   2 months old





    2  |  2  |  2  |
    1  |  1  |  1  |
    2  |  2  |  2  |
    5  |  5  |  5  |
    5  |  5  |  5  |
    5  |  5  |  5  |
    1  |  1  |  1  |
    2  |  2  |  2  |
    1  |  1  |  1  |
    2  |  2  |  2  |

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2 Answers 2

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Try the stubs package, included in complete installs of both TeX Live and MiKTeX. Example:

\documentclass[letterpaper]{article}
\usepackage[addmargin]{stubs}
\begin{document}
\thispagestyle{empty} \pagestyle{empty}
\begin{center}
\Huge Kittens

Free to good home

2 months old
\end{center}
\stubs[15]{3cm}[{\raggedright information for reverse side}]%
  {\raggedright Kittens, free to good home \\ 212-555-1212}
\end{document}

yields (on a two-sided document):

enter image description here

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Just a small addition to Mike Renfro's answer. If you need a really big font, cminch does just that:

\font\maxi=cminch scaled 600

\begin{center}
        \maxi KITTENS
\end{center}

cminch is a TeX font that only has uppercase letters and in its original design it is about one inch tall. To access it, you need to give it a name (like \maxi) using TeX's \font command. As part of it you can scale the font -- here it is scaled down to 60% as scaled 1000 refers to 100%. Once all is set up, you can use \maxi.

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3  
As long as you're using a vector font, you can use any size you want with \fontsize{...}{...}\selectfont (the first argument is the size, the second is size + space between lines, ordinarily about 20% more than the first argument). An example with Helvetica: \fontfamily{phv}\fontsize{100pt}{120pt}\selectfont KITTENS –  Philippe Goutet Jul 27 '11 at 9:24

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