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The figure in the attached image contains mathematical formulae, some of which are aligned, also it is rounded by a box, could anyone tell me how to draw that?

Thank you very much!

enter image description here

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You can use the package empheq –  Marco Daniel Aug 3 '11 at 13:56
6  
It's not clear what about this image you want to reproduce. Also, we discourage "How do I draw this?" questions. Could you maybe edit the question to be more like "How can I achieve <something>?" where <something> is some specific aspect of the image. We can help with that... –  Seamus Aug 3 '11 at 13:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If all you want is to put something in a box, you could use the mdframed package.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{mdframed}
\begin{document}
Here is some text.
And now, some framed maths:
\begin{mdframed}
  \begin{equation}
    e^{i\pi}+1=0
  \end{equation}
Some more text.
\begin{align}
  \cos^2 \theta + \sin^2 \theta &= 1 \\
  \sin\left(\theta + \frac{\pi}{2}\right) &= \cos \theta
\end{align}
\end{mdframed}
\end{document}

framed maths

This package has the advantage that it breaks across pages and fancy stuff like that. Also, changing the padding and margins is easier than with the framed package, for example. mdframed has key-value syntax for changing things. Neat.

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If you want the box to float, place it in a figure environment. From what I can see of the image it looks like that box is in a float... –  Seamus Aug 3 '11 at 14:19

Actually I don't understand well about the OP's terminologies "figure" and "draw". These 2 words in the OP's question caused me (and others) to get a wrong impression about your problem.

Option 1

Are the framed equations provided as an external image file? If it is so, then you should reproduce the equations and the framed manually as explained in Seamus's answer. Reproducing the equations gives you another benefit, i.e., you can take advantage of equation labels.

Option 2

But if you insist on importing the existing image, then use the \includegraphics{yourequation} macro from graphicx package as follows. You cannot get the benefit that I explained in the first option. In other words, the equation labels in the image will be unusable.

The following code assumes that your image has been framed.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\begin{document}
\begin{figure}[htbp]
\centering
\includegraphics[scale=1]{yourequations}
\caption{your caption}
\end{figure}
% other stuffs go here...
\end{document}

If your image has not been framed yet, then you need \fbox to frame it.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\begin{document}
\begin{figure}[htbp]
\centering
\fbox{%
\includegraphics[scale=1]{yourequations}}
\caption{your caption}
\end{figure}
% other stuffs go here...
\end{document}
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Thank you, actually I meant "option 1"... –  SoftTimur Aug 5 '11 at 21:49

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