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I'm trying to do up a resume in LaTeX however I'm wanting to use a different color for the footnote markers so that it's clear that they are not part of the normal text.

PHP, Java, C\footnote{It has been many years since I've used this in a project}, Python

This results in the following, which ends up looking like C^1:
PHP, Java, C^1, Python

How do I change the font color of the "1" to a light grey so that it's more obvious that it's separate from the main body of text.

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It all depends on exactly what do you want to colorize since there are three possible elements involved: 1) the mark used in the text to signal the footnote, 2) the mark used at the bottom of the page where the actual footnote text appears, and (possibly) 3) the mark used when cross-referencing the footnote. In the following examples I used the color red just to highlight the different results:

A redefinition of \thefootnote (like some other answers suggest) will affect all these three elements:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[paperheight=3cm]{geometry}% just for the example
\usepackage{xcolor}

\renewcommand\thefootnote{\textcolor{red}{\arabic{footnote}}}

\begin{document}

PHP, Java, C\footnote{\label{a}It has been many years since I've used this in a project}, Python

As was mentioned in~\ref{a}

\end{document}

enter image description here

If one only wants to change color to elements 1) and 2) (the marks in the body and in the actual footnote text) but not to 3) (the number used in cross-references), then a redefinition of \@makefnmark will be needed:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[paperheight=3cm]{geometry}% just for the example
\usepackage{xcolor}

\makeatletter
\renewcommand\@makefnmark{\hbox{\@textsuperscript{\normalfont\color{red}\@thefnmark}}}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

PHP, Java, C\footnote{\label{a}It has been many years since I've used this in a project}, Python

As was mentioned in~\ref{a}

\end{document}

enter image description here

Finally, if the change of color must affect only the mark used in the body of the document without affecting the mark used in the footnote text or the number used in cross-references, then redefinitions of \@makefnmark, and \@makefntext will be needed:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[paperheight=3cm]{geometry}% just for the example
\usepackage{xcolor}

\makeatletter
\renewcommand\@makefnmark{\hbox{\@textsuperscript{\normalfont\color{red}\@thefnmark}}}
\renewcommand\@makefntext[1]{%
  \parindent 1em\noindent
            \hb@xt@1.8em{%
                \hss\@textsuperscript{\normalfont\@thefnmark}}#1}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

PHP, Java, C\footnote{\label{a}It has been many years since I've used this in a project}, Python

As was mentioned in~\ref{a}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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Wow, well you gave me a lot more than I was looking for. Thank you for the amount of effort you put into your answer. You not only answered my question but I feel your answer will also be very useful for others with similar questions, so I am selecting this as the correct answer as well as a +1. Thank you. –  Gerry Aug 28 '11 at 11:46
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In preamble:

\usepackage[usenames,dvipsnames]{color}

\renewcommand{\thefootnote}{\textcolor{Gray}{\arabic{footnote}}}
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+1 Thank you for your answer –  Gerry Aug 28 '11 at 11:48
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Another possibility is:

C{\color{Gray}\footnote{TextOfTheFootnote}}
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+1 Thank you for your answer –  Gerry Aug 28 '11 at 11:41
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