Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What are the differences between efrench and frenchb? Are they compatible with one another (for example the use of \og and fg in frenchb)?

Why is efrench not in TeXLive even though its documentation claims that it is prioritary over frenchb when calling \usepackage[french]{babel}?

share|improve this question
    
In the (rather difficult to find) documentation, one sees that B. Gaulle rants about ostracism by the TeX community. I'd say that "efrench" is a substitute for Babel frenchb, but I don't know to what extent; the doc claims it has \og and \fg. –  egreg Sep 11 '11 at 19:47
1  
It's not in TeX Live because it hasn't a free license. –  egreg Sep 11 '11 at 21:49
    
Ah! That doesn't help for sure (and might very well weight in the balance as far as choosing which one to use...)! –  ℝaphink Sep 11 '11 at 21:56
    
efrench does have a free licence -- lppl (what's more, it says so in the index.html); this ought to be good enough for it to be in tl, so i'll have a word with karl –  wasteofspace Sep 12 '11 at 11:41
3  
karl berry (a) thinks the package too confused to go into tl, and (b) has noticed more than one licence statement in the bundle; i have mailed the maintainers of efrench, and they tell me they have a plan to sort it all out; this may take some time... –  wasteofspace Sep 16 '11 at 15:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

frenchb was the original babel language package for French localization. As an alternative, Bernard Gaulle created the FrenchPro package (also known as french).

Beginning 1999, the FrenchPro package was marketed as shareware, and Bernard Gaulle alone owner of all rights. He died Aug. 2nd 2007. His wife Catherine Gaulle, the heiress, gave authorization in that matter to the eFrench group in order to maintain the whole work in the future.

The package is now (under the name e-french) on CTAN (from where the quote above comes), as announced some days ago.

The package should find its way in TeX Live in a short time, as the new license is LPPL.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.