TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

How can I write numbers with empty bullet on top of them for a list:

I am trying to write $1^{\bullet}$.

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
What's an empty bullet? Something like \circ? and which list? – Christian Hupfer Jan 4 at 20:34
    
So you want your bullet numbers to have... a halo? – Alenanno Jan 4 at 20:35
    
yes a circle on the right top.think about wrinting 1^(23) but instead of 23 it would be circle .I used for a list – Carmen Mitru Jan 4 at 20:36
1  
Like this? First or second list? – Alenanno Jan 4 at 20:41
2  
Are you trying to write abbreviations for primero, segundo, etc., like 1º, 2º, 3º or 1ª, 2ª, 3ª? You can use $1^{\text{o}}$ and $1^{\text{a}}$ (in math mode) or 1\textsuperscript{o} and 1\textsuperscript{a} (in text mode) – Arun Debray Jan 4 at 20:45
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Perhaps you want a quando style numbering, which can easily be obtained with \textsuperscript, and additionally with the soulpackage for a variant:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\usepackage{enumitem}
\usepackage{soulutf8}
\def\quando{\textsuperscript{\ul{o}}}

\begin{document}

\begin{enumerate}[label=\arabic*\textsuperscript{o}]
  \item First
  \item Second
  \item Third
  \item Fourth
  \item Fifth
\end{enumerate}

\begin{enumerate}[label=\arabic*\quando, before=\setuloverlap{-0.8pt}\setul{0.8pt}{0.4pt}]
  \item First
  \item Second
  \item Third
  \item Fourth
  \item Fifth
\end{enumerate}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Why did you call it "quando"? – Alenanno Jan 5 at 12:48
    
It's from ‘primo’, ‘secundo’, ‘tertio’, &c. It is also the name of a similar command in the the efrench package. – Bernard Jan 5 at 13:41
    
Is that French then? I didn't know. – Alenanno Jan 5 at 13:50
    
I have no idea whether it is purely French. Maybe it also exists in Italian or Sapnish. Anyway, primo, secundo, &c. are Latin. – Bernard Jan 5 at 14:14
    
Yeah you're right, but googling it, I was getting French-related results. :D – Alenanno Jan 5 at 14:15

Here are two ways, a direct one with label={\arabic*$^{\circ}$} or more complicated, but somewhat more configurable, by defining a new \circlebullets 'counter' type evaluated by enumitem.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{enumitem}

\makeatletter
\def\circlebullets#1{%
  \bfseries\number\value{#1}$^{\circ}$%
}
\AddEnumerateCounter{\circlebullets}{\@circlebullets}{Foooo}


\makeatother

\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}[label={\circlebullets*}]
\item First  
\item Anotherone
\item A
\item B
\item C
\item D
\item E
\item F
\item G
\item H
\item I
\item J
\end{enumerate}

\begin{enumerate}[label={\bfseries\arabic*$^{\circ}$}]
\item First  
\item Anotherone
\item A
\item B
\item C
\item D
\item E
\item F
\item G
\item H
\item I
\item J
\end{enumerate}

\end{document}

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Assuming that is a Spanish document, and you want ordinals, you should avoid symbols like empty bullet as \circ,\degree,etc. Instead, use a small "o" because is a abbreviation ("primero" = 1.º, etc.). For this reason, in Spanish should be preceded by a dot (i.e., 1.º, not 1º) according to RAE rules.

However, 1.\textsupercript{o} is not very elegant. With babel and the spanish option you can use alternatively 1\sptext{o} or the shorhand 1"o that include the dot and adjust space and height conveniently, also in enumerate environments:

mwe

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[spanish]{babel}
\usepackage{enumitem,textcomp}
\begin{document} 
\noindent 
1$^{\circ}$  $\neq$  
1\textdegree\ $\neq$ 
1º $\neq$ 
1\textsuperscript{o} $\neq$  
1.\textsuperscript{o} $\neq$  
1\sptext{o} = 
1"o
 \begin{enumerate}[label=\arabic*"o]
   \item First
   \item Second
   \item Third
   \item Fourth
   \item Fifth
 \end{enumerate}
\end{document} 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.