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I'm using TeXStudio 2.2 (A fork of TeXMaker, formerly known as TeXMakerX) and I'm trying to make a Quickbuild option that adds in Bibtex. I've written the command line as

pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex|bibtex %.aux|pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex|pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex| pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex | 

Which I think should work, but I deleted the end of the line, as I figured there was a command I needed to add there for the internal viewer. However, according to How do I open a pdf file in the TexMaker internal PDF viewer using a user-defined quick build sequence? I need to put in the original command to run my PDF viewer, then leave the 'internal viewer' box checked. However, I have no idea what that original command was now.

I've tried

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Adobe\Reader 10.0\Reader\AcroRd32.exe" "?am.pdf"

Which is what is listed under 'Pdf viewer' but that opens the file in Adobe, even with the 'Internal Viewer' option checked.

Most of the pages I've found via google tell you to quite using the command line and use the wizard to make it for you, but that option is greyed out in my version.

So could someone tell me what the default PDF Viewer command is on Windows (7 if it matters) with Adobe Reader X (10.1.1) installed in either TeXStudio or TeXmaker?

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I hope this isn't too specific a question, or too tangentially related to LaTeX. Thank you for any help you can give me. –  Canageek Sep 22 '11 at 18:18
    
From the FAQ: “TeX related software and tools like BibTeX, LyX, LaTeX editors, viewers, and converters” are on-topic. –  Caramdir Sep 22 '11 at 18:30
    
Ah excellent. Thank you. I'll have to go searching through some archives to see if anyone has answered the BibTeX questions I have. –  Canageek Sep 22 '11 at 18:38
1  
TexStudio 2.2 is (I guess) based on TeXmaker 2.2, while in the question you linked to, TeXmaker 3.0.2 is used. I tried the exact same quick build instructions and PDF viewer path in both TeXStudio 2.2 and TeXmaker 3.0. The former opened Adobe Reader, the latter opened the internal viewer. Perhaps there is some difference between the two versions, as to how the open the internal viewer? –  Torbjørn T. Sep 22 '11 at 19:05
1  
By the way, as to your question, it shouldn't matter what the original command was (I have "C:/Program Files (x86)/Adobe/Reader 10.0/Reader/AcroRd32.exe" %.pdf). As long as you have the same text string both places, it works fine -- in TeXmaker 3. TeXstudio unfortunately seems to work slightly different with regards to this. –  Torbjørn T. Sep 22 '11 at 19:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For the recent version (4.1.1) of Texmaker, the solution provided in How do I open a pdf file in the TexMaker internal PDF viewer using a user-defined quick build sequence? should still work and open the internal PDF viewer instead of the external one.


In TeXstudio (current version: 2.7.0), however, the implementation has changed: Now the internal PDF viewer is opened by specifying txs:///view-pdf-internal1 in the user-defined Quick Build command. So the correct call would be

pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex|bibtex %.aux|pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex|pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex|pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode %.tex|txs:///view-pdf-internal

in your case.

1Until TeXstudio version 2.5.1, it was tmx://internal-pdf-viewer.

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You sir or madame, are awesome. I have tested that and it works perfectly. –  Canageek Sep 25 '11 at 16:00
1  
For TeXstudio 2.7.0 (and probably a few earlier versions) it is txs:///view-pdf. The command suggested in the answer above doesn't work for me. –  VaNa Mar 17 at 19:06

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