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I would like to print (several) single sided A5 booklets using my double-sided A4 printer. I am using the example from http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/150302/34993 currently as a template. However, I would like to avoid cutting the printouts at all. That is I want to fold the printouts and just place them inside each other. I will staple all the pages together in the end at the "spine".

If we imagine looking at the booklet closed and then turning the pages one by one, I only want print on the right hand page. That is the left hand page should always be blank. The cover should go on the front page of course.

In other words, the pages as we go through the book should be Cover, blank, page 1, blank, page 2, blank, page 3 etc.

In this way, the final page will be printed on the same piece of paper as the Cover on the opposite side of the paper.

Is there an automated way to achieve this slightly complicated result?

Here is a sample document I am starting with.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[osf]{garamondx}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[cmyk,dvipsnames]{xcolor}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usepackage{lettrine}
\usepackage{lipsum}
%\setlength{\DefaultNindent}{0em}
\setcounter{DefaultLines}{4}
\input Zallman.fd
\newcommand*\initfamily{\usefont{U}{Zallman}{xl}{n}}
\renewcommand{\LettrineFontHook}{\initfamily}
\usepackage{bbding}
\pagestyle{empty}
\linespread{1.5}
\begin{document}
  \newcommand{\pamphlet}{%
    {\Huge\hfill\textsc{\textcolor{RoyalBlue}{T}he
        \textcolor{RoyalBlue}{F}reedom} \textit{of} \textsc{the
        \textcolor{RoyalBlue}{P}ress}\hfill} \vspace{\baselineskip}

    \lettrine{\textcolor{RoyalBlue}{I}}{} am well acquainted with all
    the arguments against freedom of thought and speech ---the
    arguments which claim that it cannot exist, and the arguments
    which claim that it ought not to.  I answer simply that they don't
    convince me and that our civilization over a period of four
    hundred years has been founded on the opposite notice.  For quite
    a decade past I have believed that the existing Russian
    \textit{r\'egime} is a mainly evil thing, and I claim the right to
    say so, in spite of the fact that we are allies with the USSR in a
    war which I want to see won.  If I had to choose a text to justify
    myself, I should choose the line from Milton:

    \begin{quote}
      \itshape By the known rules of ancient liberty.
    \end{quote}

    The word \textit{ancient} emphasizes the fact that intellectual
    freedom is a deep--rooted tradition without which our
    characteristic western culture could only doubtfully exist.  From
    that tradition many of our intellectuals are visibly turning away.
    They have accepted the principle that a book should be published
    or suppressed, praised or damned, not on its merits but according
    to political expediency.  And others who do not actually hold this
    view assent to it from sheer cowardice.  An example of this is the
    failure of the numerous and vocal English pacifists to raise their
    voices against the prevalent worship of Russian militarism.
    According to those pacifists, all violence is evil, and they have
    urged us at every stage of the war to give in or at least to make
    a compromise peace.  But how many of them have ever suggested that
    war is also evil when it is waged by the Red Army?  Apparently the
    Russians have a right to defend themselves, whereas for us to do
    [\textit{so}] is a deadly sin.  One can only explain this
    contradiction in one way: that is, by a cowardly desire to keep in
    with the bulk of the intelligentsia, whose patriotism is directed
    towards the USSR rather than towards Britain.  I know that the
    English intelligentsia have plenty of reason for their timidity
    and dishonesty, indeed I know by heart the arguments by which they
    justify themselves.  But at least let us have no more nonsense
    about defending liberty against Fascism.  If liberty means
    anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not
    want to hear.  The common people still vaguely subscribe to that
    doctrine and act on it.  In our country ---it is not the same in
    all countries: it was not so in republican France, and
    it is not so in the USA today--- it is the liberals who fear
    liberty and the intellectuals who want to do dirt on the
    intellect: it is to draw attention to that fact that I have
    written this preface.

    \vspace{\baselineskip}
    \noindent\textit{Extract from}
    \textsc{The Freedom of the Press}\textit{, by
      \textcolor{RoyalBlue}{George Orwell}.
      Proposed Preface to `Animal Farm', 1945.
      First published: The Times Literary Supplement,
      September 15, 1972.}\par
  } \pamphlet 

  \lipsum{100}
\end{document}
share|improve this question
1  
Read the comments in this question (unanswered). tex.stackexchange.com/questions/182659/… and this question has I believe a useful answer. tex.stackexchange.com/questions/154777/… – R. Schumacher Mar 4 at 19:45
    
This looks like a job for an external utility to manage pdf files such as pdftk. As far as I know, outputting content out of order is tricky to do in pure tex. I suggest you add a few commands to your build script, rather than insist on doing it inside tex. – Federico Poloni Mar 5 at 8:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you do not have too many pages, you could do it this way. However, it is not entirely automatic as you need to tell pdfpages to insert the blank pages.

We start by creating prebooklet.pdf from the sample file used in my earlier answer:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage[a5paper,verbose]{geometry}
\usepackage{lipsum}  % this package is for creating filler text

\author{N.~N}
\title{The booklet}

\begin{document}

\maketitle

\tableofcontents

\section{Europe}
\subsection{Berlin}
\lipsum[4]
\subsection{Paris}
\lipsum[1-3]
\subsection{Vienna}
\lipsum[10]
\subsection{Rome}
\lipsum[15]
\section{Africa}
\lipsum[1-4]
\subsection{Accra}
\lipsum[5-8]
\subsection{Johannesburg}
\lipsum[9-11]
\subsection{Casablanca}
\lipsum[11-12]
\lipsum[5-6]
\section{Asia}
\lipsum[1-4]
\subsection{Tokyo}
\lipsum[5-8]
\subsection{Beijing}
\lipsum[9-11]
\subsection{Mumbai}
\lipsum[11-12]
\lipsum[5-6]

\end{document}

This generates a 17-page A5 document. We then use pdfpages to produce the booklet as follows:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage[a4paper]{geometry}
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\includepdfset{pages=-}

\author{N.~N}
\title{The booklet}
\pagestyle{empty}

\begin{document}

  \includepdf[pages=-,booklet,landscape,pages={1,{},2,{},3,{},4,{},5,{},6,{},7,{},8,{},9,{},10,{},11,{},12,{},13,{},14,{},15,{},16,{},17}]{prebooklet.pdf}

\end{document}

The {} in the page specification tells pdfpages to insert a blank page. Because the page numbers are already set in the original .tex file, this does not affect the visible pagination in any way.

booklet

share|improve this answer

Here is a solution.

First we add a blank page after each page

file1.tex (suppose the original file is file.tex)

\documentclass{article}     
%-------------------------------------------------
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\usepackage[a5paper]{geometry}
\geometry{scale=1,centering}
%-------------------------------------------------
\newcounter{mt}
\pagestyle{empty}
\begin{document}
\loop
\stepcounter{mt}%
\includepdf[pages={\themt}]{file.pdf}
\null\newpage
\ifnum\value{mt}<\the\pdflastximagepages
\repeat
\end{document}

Then we make it a booklet with pdfpages package

\documentclass{article}     
%-------------------------------------------------
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\usepackage[a4paper]{geometry}
\geometry{scale=1,centering}
%-------------------------------------------------
\begin{document}
\includepdf[nup=1x2, landscape, booklet,
            pages={-},
            offset=3mm 3mm,
            delta=2mm 10mm,frame]{file1.pdf}
\end{document}
share|improve this answer
    
I just tried this but I get docdro.id/YMOf7AB . If you look at the page 3 for example you will see there is a page border which appears in the middle of the page. – Lembik Mar 5 at 7:38
1  
this is because of the option frame (used just for the show) you can remove it. – touhami Mar 5 at 8:14
    
Thank you that works. How can I make the A5 pages centred with small margins? Currently they appear small and with a huge right margin. – Lembik Mar 5 at 9:22
    
first try \includepdf[nup=1x2, landscape, booklet, pages={-}]{file1.pdf} (this is the default values) and you can try \includepdf[nup=1x2, landscape, booklet, pages={-}, trim=1cm 1cm 1cm 1cm, clip]{file1.pdf} – touhami Mar 5 at 11:05
1  
I think you need to add to your first document file.tex some thing like \usepackage[a5paper,margin={1cm,1.5cm}]{geometry} – touhami Mar 5 at 18:54

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