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I tried to build my first presentation and met my first problem: I would like to know how to create a part of my presentation that looks like the example below. Instead of writing 3 frames, I would lite to write 1 frame which contains a figure and some text beneath it; and I would like the text to change as I 'arrow' through the presentation, because that makes it easier to explain a figure. Otherwise, I would be forced to change the "pages" all the time back and forth. What would be annoying for my audiance.

\documentclass{beamer}
\usepackage{graphicx}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
\frametitle{Example}
\begin{figure}
\includegraphics[width=1\textwidth]{Figure}
  \caption{Caption}
\end{figure}
bla    1
\end{frame}



\begin{frame}
\frametitle{Example}
\begin{figure}
\includegraphics[width=1\textwidth]{Figure}
  \caption{Caption}
\end{figure}
bla 2
\end{frame}

\begin{frame}
\frametitle{Example}
\begin{figure}
\includegraphics[width=1\textwidth]{Figure}
  \caption{Caption}
\end{figure}
bla 3
\end{frame}

\end{document}

So in this example the figure stays the same, but the text (underneath) changes. Does anyone know how to get that result?

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I don't really understand the phrasing of the question. I think that instead of writing 3 frames, you want to write 1 frame which contains a figure and some text beneath it; you would like the text to change as you 'arrow' through the presentation. Is this an accurate interpretation? –  cmhughes Oct 11 '11 at 19:19
    
That is exactly what I wanted to say. Thank you! –  Philip Oct 11 '11 at 19:34
    
In that case, I did understand correctly. –  Loop Space Oct 11 '11 at 19:38
    
@Philip It might be useful for future readers to make the edit. –  cmhughes Oct 11 '11 at 19:45
1  
@cmhughes: I did so. I hope it is clear now. –  Philip Oct 11 '11 at 19:59
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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I must admit that I'm not totally sure that I understand what you want, but if I do then I would do (something like) the following:

\documentclass{beamer}
\usepackage{graphicx}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
\frametitle{Example}
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=1\textwidth]{Figure}

Caption
\end{center}
\begin{overprint}
\onslide<+|handout:0>
bla    1
\onslide<+|handout:0>
bla 2
\onslide<+-|handout:0>
bla 3
\end{overprint}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

Note that I've changed the figure environment to just a plain center: you probably don't want your figure floating around the page. This also meant changing the \caption to just the caption.

The overprint environment is a bit like an itemize environment in that its contents get divided up. In this case, by the \onslide commands. Each of those specifies some content to be put on a particular slide (the stuff between the successive \onslide commands). The overprint environment ensures that it takes up the same amount of space on each slide, which makes it so that there's no danger of the picture "jumping" between slide transitions (as can sometimes happen if stuff takes up different amounts of vertical space on the slides).

For more on beamer and how to handle successive slides, I heartily recommend reading the user guide. If there's stuff in the above that you don't understand, I can happily point you to the relevant part of the guide. For example, the overprint environment is explained in section 9.5 of the manual. If things like \onslide are new to you then I suggest you start with the "tutorial" section at the start of the manual to see what is possible. (And, of course, ask questions here.)

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It is what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Philip Oct 11 '11 at 19:50
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