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I would like to typeset a simple-to-medium-difficulty math formula on an A4/letter paper. It needs to be huge and preferably centered and portrait.

I can take care of the paper size, the orientation — but not the centering and font size.

Any resources you can recommend?

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Related Question: Reducing font size in equation. –  Peter Grill Jun 23 '12 at 0:46
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The graphicx package provides the command \resizebox. The lscape package provides the landscape environment.

Together they could be used as follows:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[paper=a4paper]{geometry}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{lscape}

\begin{document}
\pagestyle{empty}

\begin{landscape}
\begin{center}
 \resizebox{20cm}{!}{$e^{i\pi}=-1$}
\end{center}
\end{landscape}

\end{document}

Note that the \resizebox takes arguments \resizebox{width}{height}. In the above I have used {!} for the height to ensure that the aspect ratio remains true- otherwise you might get ugly stretched boxes.

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Absolutely perfect. Thank you –  Honza Pokorny Oct 13 '11 at 1:37
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There are several ways to do this:

  1. You can use \scalebox from the graphicx package.
  2. Use the relsize package.
  3. Use \DeclareMathSizes but that will affect the entire document.

Here is the normal, and scaled result using the \scalebox solution:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\newcommand*{\Scale}[2][4]{\scalebox{#1}{\ensuremath{#2}}}%
\begin{document}
\[y = \sin^2 x\]
%
\[\Scale[6]{y = \sin^2 x}\]
\end{document}

Or, using the relsize package, but it did not appear to get larger using a factor larger than 5. Perhaps there is a way to adjust this.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{relsize}
\begin{document}
\[y = \sin^2 x\]
%
\larger[5]
\[y = \sin^2 x\]
\end{document}
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1  
Note that \resize change the font size relative to the current size. Moreover, this is only done in the regular font size intervals. That is, \larger[1] in \normalsize is equivalent to \large, or \relsize{-2} in \small is equivalent to \scriptsize. As such, this is typically limited to \tiny (on the lower end) and \Huge (on the upper end). That is reason why a "factor" (or "magnification step") of 5, which equates to \Huge in \normalsize yields the biggest difference (making 6 or higher superfluous). –  Werner Oct 13 '11 at 2:18
    
\scalebox does a fine job for me. Thanks Peter! –  erickfis Feb 27 at 17:48
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