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Some times I need to check the typesetting - wither I've made a formula right. For such cases I need to have an interactive TeX interpreter -- with no customisations - I just want to check the formula. Maybe You know something like that?

By the way - I'm on Kubuntu 11.10

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Could you define a little more precise what you mean when you say that you want to "check the formula"? –  Speldosa Nov 3 '11 at 11:00
    
I mean sometimes I write a TeX code in the forum for example - and I want to make sure it'll render correctly. –  Adobe Nov 3 '11 at 11:06
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@Adobe This is mathjax which is a JavaScipt application based on TeX. –  Yiannis Lazarides Nov 3 '11 at 11:14
    
Which forum? There are lots of maths-enabled fora and there are several ways to get maths rendered. Although many are based on TeX syntax, not many actually use TeX. MathJaX is one, iTeX is another. If you could be more specific, it might be easier to help you. –  Andrew Stacey Nov 3 '11 at 11:23
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None of the solutions (including your own) is actually what you want. What you need is a webpage with a text box in which you could write some LaTeX maths and have MathJaX work on the result. That doesn't involve TeX at all. –  Andrew Stacey Nov 3 '11 at 13:54
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8 Answers

If online version is good for you, check this! This is an online LaTeX equation editor, which renders real-time the inserted LaTeX-code. Plus you can download your equation as an image :)

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Could you add a little more detail? It is better to explain in the post what a link is about so that someone can have a reasonable idea what they are going to click on and make an initial assessment as to the value of the contribution without having to click on links. Thanks. –  Andrew Stacey Nov 3 '11 at 13:36
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Okay, you've right. Edited. –  uzsolt Nov 3 '11 at 13:42
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For Mac OSX there is the superb LaTeXit LaTeXit tool for this purpose. It even provides means to copy&paste the resulting PDFs into other applications (such as Keynote or LyX) with the LaTeX code embedded into the PDF metadata. Thereby you (or your colleague) can later copy&paste it back to LaTeXit to edit the results.

I use it mostly for TikZ figures in my Keynote presentations.

enter image description here

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

Oh I found that: sage notebook provides the functionality. You type in the cell

%latex
$\rho$

just renders the latex.

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Prepare a file sample.tex containing

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,amssymb}

\begin{document}

and then, from the shell, run

pdflatex '\input{sample}$\rho$\stop'

This may be turned into a shell function, just to read standard input and putting it in place of $\rho$ in the example command line.

You can add to sample.tex all packages allowed from the forum.

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You could try the Gummi editor. It offers a live preview and should be available in the repositories of your Linux distribution.

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There's also OOLaTeX -- which is an extension to LibreOffice (OpenOffice.org) -- and it provides the required functionality.

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You should try the online equation editor at formulasheet.com. It has an instant live preview. It will also help you find symbols if your forget their LaTeX syntax.

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Yet another on-line free service: http://www.sciweavers.org/free-online-latex-equation-editor

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