Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Some typographers say it's a good habit to increase the letterspace when writing words in caps or small caps. So my question is, how to do it with pdflatex and/or xelatex? And while we're at it, which words would you alter this way? Acronyms like USA, NATO, IBM, GNU, etc.? How about words like PCs, UdSSR, FreeBSD or TV-Station?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

Use the microtype package, loading it with [tracking=smallcaps] should take care of small caps

For all-uppercase words you can use microtype's \textls, e.g.

\newcommand{\versal}[1]{\textscale{0.9}{\textls*[80]{#1}}}

(I came across this here, check the provided “Präambel”, the spacing/scaling might be font specific, so use with care and check your output, maybe someone else could comment on this one)

hope this helps

share|improve this answer

In XeLaTeX with the fontspec package you can select a font with the LetterSpace feature:

\newcommand\tracked[1]{%
  {\addfontfeature{LetterSpace=2}#1}}

LetterSpace=s is an additional s/F space between letters where F is the font size.

(I swear I once saw an example of letterspacing involving additional glue rather than just fixed space, but I can't see anything around that this could be. Any idea?)

share|improve this answer

Another example, this is what's used in the TUGboat journal:

\usepackage{relsize}
\def\acro#1{\textsmaller{#1}\@}

They also have a list of abbreviations/acronyms you can use to get some ideas how/what to letterspace, see tugboat.dtx

For example,

\def\MacOSX{Mac\,\acro{OS\,X}}

or

\def\MathML{Math\acro{ML}}

You can use the microtype package and AssBurger's \versal command if you want additional microtypgraphic features like increased letterspace.

share|improve this answer

you can also use the soul package for letterspacing with xelatex since microtype is not supported yet by xelatex (as far as I know)

I would use letterspacing on small caps for titles.

share|improve this answer
    
As long as you don't use non-ascii characters, it seems. All č, ć, ž, đ, š letters are simply lost with soul. –  Meho R. Feb 7 '11 at 12:12
    
@MehoR.Use Heiko Oberdiek’s extended package soulutf8: see the documentation at ctan.uib.no/macros/latex/contrib/oberdiek/soulutf8.pdf –  Sveinung Mar 18 '12 at 23:23

Something I found on a UK mailing list while searching for a solution to increase the letterspace that I think is important to know:

Possibly the ‘ultimate’ in this field is the microtype, which uses the micro-typography capabilities of current PDFTeX to provide a \textls command, which operates according to parameters declared in a \SetTracking command. Microtype’s ‘tracking’ facility expands the natural spacing font itself, rather than inserting space between characters.

share|improve this answer
4  
Welcome to tex.sx! microtype and its \textls command were already pointed out in Assburger's answer. –  lockstep Mar 9 '12 at 23:23
1  
Thank you for the nice welcome! With my answer I just wanted to highlight, that \textls builds on the natural spacing of the font. If I have to decide among a selection of working solutions, I would choose this one because of consistency. –  Matthias Kolja Miehl Apr 2 '12 at 19:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.