Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I type something like this:

{\itshape\LARGE
  Dunt venim dolorerosto do odit
  ametum vulla conum dolore
  conulput in vero od el
  Dunt venim dolorerosto do odit
  ametum vulla conum dolore
  conulput in vero od el
}

it results in a block of 4 lines with narrow spacing between the 1st and 2nd line and between the 3rd and 4th line. Line spacing between the 2nd and 3rd line is normal.

I can't fully explaing it to myself so I am looking for a short description for this behaviour. I know for example that with a \par at the end of the text (inside the group), the calculation would correct. But I have no idea why...

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Make sure to end the paragraph (using \par, for example) before leaving the group; compare:

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

% wrong    
{\itshape\LARGE
  Dunt venim dolorerosto do odit
  ametum vulla conum dolore
  conulput in vero od el
  Dunt venim dolorerosto do odit
  ametum vulla conum dolore
  conulput in vero od el
}

% right    
{\itshape\LARGE
  Dunt venim dolorerosto do odit
  ametum vulla conum dolore
  conulput in vero od el
  Dunt venim dolorerosto do odit
  ametum vulla conum dolore
  conulput in vero od el\par
}

\end{document}

The reason why a \par (or some form of paragraph ending) is needed is that \LARGE (and the other font size changing commands) changes the the value for \baselineskip and \par is the command that ends the paragraph and applies the right \baselineskip.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Can you provide some reason as to why the \par was necessary. –  Peter Grill Nov 29 '11 at 1:59
    
Yes, because I've already mentioned the \par-solution ;) –  ejoerns Nov 29 '11 at 2:01
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.