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How can I write this in TeX (or LaTeX)?

enter image description here

Also, strictly speaking, this is not part of my question, but has anyone seen notation like this? If so, please answer this question.

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1  
Does \stackrel{\omega}{A} help? :) –  Paulo Cereda Nov 30 '11 at 15:38
    
Close, but the omega is a bit off to the left. –  Paul Reiners Nov 30 '11 at 15:46
3  
possible duplicate of Customized accent symbol –  Leo Liu Nov 30 '11 at 16:00

4 Answers 4

You can use \overset like this: $\overset{\omega}{A}$ but the result will not be great (the A is slanted and therefore the centering looks off. I like \operatorname* better, since it doesn't make the A slanted. You can use it like:

\[
  \operatorname*{A}^\omega
\]

The results look like this (\overset above, \operatorname below):

overset vs operatorname

I have never seen the notation before by the way.

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With \operatorname you get wrong spacing. –  egreg Nov 30 '11 at 15:42
    
What, exactly, is rather wrong? –  Paul Reiners Nov 30 '11 at 15:43
    
@PaulReiners: The spacing to the left and right of the A will be off. If you feel the omega is off to the left, it's not. Just looks that way because the A is slanted. I like it better with the A upright. You could use \overset{\omega}{\textrm{A}} to make it look like the \operatorname approach and still get correct spacing. By the way, if you want to respond to someone (in this case egreg) use @egreg to have him notified. –  Roelof Spijker Nov 30 '11 at 15:53
    
@PaulReiners An operator carries with it spacing rules that are different from those regarding an ordinary symbol. Compare $A\operatorname*{A}$ and $AA$. –  egreg Dec 1 '11 at 8:34
    
Why not \overset{\omega}{\mathrm{A}}, without abusing \operatorname? –  egreg Dec 1 '11 at 8:35
\usepackage{amsmath}

\overset{\omega}{A}

Never seen such a beast.

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You may use \stackrel with some movement magic:

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}
\[\stackrel{\enskip\omega}{A}\]
\end{document}

with result:

result

Or if you need it sans serif italic like you've shown:

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
\[\stackrel{\,\,\omega}{\textsf{\textit{A}}}\]
\end{document}

A very nice solution would be to use package accents, that prevents you from using any movement magic, als long as you are using math fonts only:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{accents}

\begin{document}
Nice:
\[\accentset{\omega}{A}\]
Not so nice:
\[\accentset{\omega}{\textsf{\textit{A}}}\]
\end{document}
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\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{accents}

\begin{document}
$\accentset{\omega}{A}$
\end{document}
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