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When writing lists, sometimes I need to make lists within lists:

\documentclass{apa}
\begin{document}
    \begin{enumerate}
        \item This is an item.
        \begin{enumerate}
            \item This is another item.
        \end{enumerate}
    \end{enumerate}
\end{document}

With the APA document class, this seems to produce a list with "1. 1.", but the second item is not deeper. How can I make a nested list?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The apa6e class does what you want.

As far as I can tell, both apa and apa6e conform to the (different) guidelines for manuscript submissions to APA, so they aren't really useful for producing standalone documents (and indeed the resulting appearance is ugly).

These classes are aimed to producing "format independent" LaTeX documents, that will be later reshaped to conform the style of the various journals of APA.

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According to the documentation of the apa class, enumerate and itemize

are used in the same way the standard LaTeX environments enumerate and itemize are used, but produce output according to the APA style.

If you really want standard-style list environments, load the enumitem package.

\documentclass{apa}
\usepackage{enumitem}
\begin{document}
    \begin{enumerate}
        \item This is an item.
        \begin{enumerate}
            \item This is another item.
        \end{enumerate}
    \end{enumerate}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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Does this mean, people wishing to conform to the APA style cannot use lists in this way? –  Village Dec 14 '11 at 6:06
    
@Village: I'd presume so (though I'm not versed in APA's requirements). –  lockstep Dec 14 '11 at 6:08

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