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This might be the stupidest question ever asked on TeX.sx, but I recently changed my paragraphing style and now run into problems. Consider the following MWE:

\documentclass{scrartcl}

\begin{document}

This is a line. This is a line. This is a line. This is a line. This is a line. 

Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph.\\

New block again indented. Should not be indented.

\end{document}

It produces the following output:

Indented new paragraph

In my opinion, there should not be an indented in the second paragraph. How do I avoid this?

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5  
Even though you probably don't want to hear this, some general advice: Don't use \\ + empty line. Semantically, it makes no sense to start a new line and then start a new paragraph right away. You can read more about whitespace and structure in section 2.1 (3.5 pages) et seqq. of the Not So Short Introduction to LaTeX2e. –  doncherry Jan 8 '12 at 11:24
    
Are you looking to avoid indenting specific paragraphs or to generally have no indents and to have 'blank lines' between paragraphs? –  Joseph Wright Jan 8 '12 at 11:30
    
The latter :-). –  Ingo Jan 8 '12 at 11:35
    
doncherry, why does it not make sense? In my opinion it can be useful to give some more structure to your text. You can detail one thought in a paragraph. There will be several subpoints that are explained in indented new lines. When you want make a completely new point, you insert a blank line and start a new paragraph. Frankly, I understand this might not be the way to do it in the natural sciences. But for sociological texts or so it can make sense, in my humble opinion. –  Ingo Jan 8 '12 at 11:37
    
@tehingo: I'm a student of philology, no natural science here :). The idea is that you don't tell LaTeX "make a new line here" or the like, but you tell LaTeX about the semantic structure of your document and LaTeX decides for you where to put which space and which break. Another advantage of using this so-called semantic markup: Once you start writing some really long paper, you can change your layout at the end really easily by redefining e.g. \mylinebreak (from my answer), if you decide you don't want the indentation in the end. –  doncherry Jan 8 '12 at 11:40
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Manual solution: Add \noindent at the beginning of the paragraph that shouldn't be indented.

Automatic solution: Enable parskip, i.e. space in between paragraphs and create a custom macro for "indented linebreaks". This works, but by all means isn't pretty. What I wrote in my comment to your question still applies, and have a look at p. 49f (0.5 pages) of section 3.1.3 of the KOMA-Script manual about the disadvantages of parskip.

\documentclass[parskip=full]{scrartcl}

\newcommand{\mylinebreak}{\newline\hspace*{11pt}}% 11pt is about the standard \parindent
                 %(but only if you don't use a font size option to your document class!)

\begin{document}

This is a line. This is a line. This is a line. This is a line. This is a line.\mylinebreak
Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph. Indented new paragraph.

New block again indented. Should not be indented.

\end{document}

screenshot of the output

To find out the current \parindent (e.g. if you've loaded a document class with a 12pt option), remove the parskip option and add \the\parskip to your document body, which will print the current value of \parindent to your document.

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Thanks, I will rethink my approach for future papers. For this one, however, I will stick to your solution. It is required by some teachers at university, so I'm obliged to do it that way. Oh well, I think many of us can sing a song of that. –  Ingo Jan 8 '12 at 11:40
2  
Yes, the biggest disadvantage of LaTeX is that not everybody uses it :). University requirements often get in the way of good typography. –  doncherry Jan 8 '12 at 11:42
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